Now Playing
Y100 FM

Posted: January 04, 2018

Weather vs. climate: Why a cold winter doesn't refute climate change

What Is A Nor'easter?

By Greg Bluestein, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Call it fortuitous timing. Hours before U.S. President Donald Trump issued a tweet last week panning climate change, a University of Georgia climatologist offered a lengthy pre-emptive explanation.

>> ‘Bombogenesis': What is it and why is everyone saying it?

“What we are seeing right now in the United States is just … well … wait for it … winter,” wrote Marshall Shepherd, director of the atmospheric science program at the University of Georgia and a former president of the American Meteorological Society.

>> What is a Nor’easter and how does it form?

Shepherd wrote that he would urge people to keep in mind that “weather is mood, climate is personality” and that weekly weather patterns say little about longer-term climate change.

>> Trump tweets ‘good old Global Warming’ could help with frigid temps

It came about 12 hours before Trump tweeted that forecasts were calling for record cold New Year’s Eve temperatures.

>> See the tweet here

Shepherd wrote that even as climate warms, the seasons will always change to winter and yield frigid weather, snowstorms and blizzards. After all, he said, winter is related to how the Earth is tilted on its axis as it revolves around the sun.

>> Read more trending news 

Concludes Shepherd: "For now, the message for this week and the next seven days is that winter is reminding us that it still exists and always will even as our climate warms. Prepare accordingly, stay warm and help others."


Related

Jack Hanrahan/AP

Trump tweets ‘good old Global Warming’ could help with frigid temps

Jack Hanrahan/AP

Trump tweets ‘good old Global Warming’ could help with frigid temps

Chelse Volgyes clears snow from her car in Erie, Pa., Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017. Freezing temperatures and below-zero wind chills socked much of the northern United States on Wednesday, and the snow-hardened city of Erie, dug out from a record snowfall. (Jack Hanrahan/Erie Times-News via AP)

'Bombogenesis': What is it and why is everyone saying it?

It seems like this year's wacky weather term is "bombogenesis."

Every year, there seems to be a new weather term that grabs everyone's attention. But they're almost never new and they're always less fantastical than they sound. 

>> What is a ‘bomb cyclone’ and what will happen when it arrives?

This year's word is bombogenesis, a term that simply describes the rapid pressure drop in a storm system

While you may have not heard the term until recently, there have been many New England storms that have undergone the process of bombogenesis.

The nor'easter tracking up the U.S. coast this week will drop pressure fast as it strengthens, increasing its expected wind and precipitation. 

>> What is a Nor’easter and how does it form?

Typically, a storm with lower pressure has stronger winds and can produce intense rain or, in this case, snowfall rates. 

So now that we know this storm will drop pressure fast or undergo "bombogenesis," we are expecting some hefty snowfall and strong, damaging winds.

>> Read more trending news 

The wind could knock out power to many areas and cause problems with the frigid temperatures that will follow this storm over the weekend.

  What is a ‘bomb cyclone’ and what happens when it arrives?
 

What is a ‘bomb cyclone’ and what happens when it arrives?

What exactly is a “bomb cyclone?”

The ominous name “bomb cyclone” comes from a process called explosive cyclogenesis, or bombogenesis, in which a weather system undergoes a rapid drop in pressure. 

Bombogenesis occurs “when a midlatitude cyclone rapidly intensifies, dropping at least 24 millibars over 24 hours,” according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

>> Read more trending news 

A millibar measures atmospheric pressure. A drop in pressure in a system equals strengthening of the system. 

Think of it as a winter hurricane.

Such weather systems in the northern hemisphere are centers of low pressure. When the pressure drops, the storms get stronger. When they drop in such a dramatic fashion over a short period of time, the results are equally dramatic.

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

 
 

 

@Y100SanAntonio Instagram

 

Amazon Alexa

Enable our Skill today to listen live at home on your Alexa Devices!