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Posted: January 16, 2018

Japanese national broadcaster issues false North Korea missile alert

5 things to Know about North Korea’s Nuclear Threat

By Michelle Ewing, Cox Media Group National Content Desk

TOKYO —

Japan's national public broadcaster issued a false alert about a North Korean missile launch Tuesday, just three days after Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency sent a false missile alert. 

>> Worker who sent mistaken missile message reassigned

According to CNN, NHK sent a message to users of its phone app that said, "NHK news alert. North Korea likely to have launched missile. The government J alert: Evacuate inside the building or underground."

Minutes after the alert went out, NHK issued a correction and apologized.

>> Read more trending news 

"The news alert sent earlier about NK missile was a mistake," the broadcaster said, according to CNN. "No government J alert was issued."

Read more here.

Hawaiian Missile Threat Alert is False Alarm


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AP

Japanese national broadcaster issues false North Korea missile alert

AP

Japanese national broadcaster issues false North Korea missile alert

FILE - in this Aug. 29, 2017 file photo distributed on Aug. 30, 2017, by the North Korean government shows what was said to be the test launch of a Hwasong-12 intermediate range missile in Pyongyang, North Korea. North and South Korea sat down to talk Tuesday after a year that had seen only mounting tension, as North Korea conducted tests of ever-more capable missiles and its largest nuclear detonation ever, and the U.S. and its allies responded with harsh rhetoric and sanctions. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP, File)

Worker who sent mistaken missile message reassigned

The person who hit the button that sent an emergency alert warning people living in or visiting Hawaii that a ballistic missile was heading to the island state has been reassigned.

Officials have not named the person responsible, but NBC News reported that the person has a new job that is not connected to the emergency alert system.

USAToday reported that the person at the center of the mistaken alert, and who has been reassigned has worked for the agency for a decade. 

“All we will say is that the individual has been temporarily reassigned within our Emergency Operations Center pending the outcome of our internal investigation, and it is currently in a role that does not provide access to the warning system,” Richard Rapoza, a spokesman for Hawaii Emergency Management System told NBC News.

Rapoza did not disclose what the person’s job is.

>>Missile threat alert in Hawaii is false alarm, rattles nerves

The worker ran an internal test Saturday and was supposed to select a template that would have kept the message internally. Instead the person chose the template that sends the message to everyone, CNN reported

The fail-safe for sending a message is a warning that requires the person to confirm the message is to be sent. The person clicked “yes” instead of “no” and sent the message to everyone in Hawaii, including radio and television stations, CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Hawaii has been running siren tests since North Korea announced that it has the capability to hit the U.S. with a missile. The tests have been suspended as officials investigate the message that was sent over the weekend. Officials have also set up a new template for false alarms, CNN reported

Minutes after the alert went out, Hawaiian officials said there was no threat via social media. 

But it took nearly 40 minutes for a second alert to be pushed out to devices through the alert system.

Missile threat alert in Hawaii is false alarm, rattles nerves

Some people in Hawaii received a rude awakening Saturday morning.

At approximately 8:08 a.m. local time, residents received an alert on their phones about a ballistic missile threat. The alert message urged residents to seek immediate shelter and stated that it was not a drill.

Within minutes, Hawaii’s Emergency Management Association announced on Twitter that there was no threat. Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard also confirmed on Twitter that it was a false alarm.

Hawaii’s EMA said that the alert went out in error as part of a drill.

Residents expressed concern about how the false alert was transmitted and the length of time it took to send an updated alert. It took approximately 40 minutes for the corrected alert to go out.

In recent months, North Korea has claimed to possess a ballistic missile that could reach Hawaii and the U.S. mainland.

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