Now Playing
Y100 FM
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Y100 FM

Posted: June 07, 2017

James Comey testimony: Three important takeaways from Comey’s opening statement 


Related

James Comey testimony: Three important takeaways from  Comey’s opening statement 
In this March 20, 2017 photo, FBI Director James Comey pauses as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the House Intelligence Committee hearing on allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Comey’s appearance Thursday before the Senate intelligence committee is one of the most anticipated congressional hearings in years. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

By Debbie Lord, Cox Media Group National Content Desk

Former FBI Director James Comey on Wednesday released the opening statement he plans to give Thursday before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

The statement, according to Comey, includes notes he made following meetings and phone calls with President Donald Trump. 

Comey says that he “can recall nine one-on-one conversations with President Trump in four months—three in person and six on the phone.” 

Here are three important points from Comey’s statement.

1Trump asked if Comey could “let go” of the investigation of Michael Flynn.

"The President then returned to the topic of Mike Flynn, saying, “He is a good guy and has been through a lot.” He repeated that Flynn hadn’t done anything wrong on his calls with the Russians, but had misled the Vice President. He then said, “I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn... He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.” I replied only that “he is a good guy.” (In fact, I had a positive experience dealing with Mike Flynn when he was a colleague as Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency at the beginning of my term at FBI.) I did not say I would “let this go.”

2. Trump asked on several occasions if Comey could make it clear he was not under investigation by the FBI.

During a January 6 meeting

... "prior to the January 6 meeting, I discussed with the FBI’s leadership team whether I should be prepared to assure President-Elect Trump that we were not investigating him personally. That was true; we did not have an open counter-intelligence case on him. We agreed I should do so if circumstances warranted. During our one-on-one meeting at Trump Tower, based on President-Elect Trump’s reaction to the briefing and without him directly asking the question, I offered that assurance.”

During a January 27 dinner

“During the dinner, the President returned to the salacious material I had briefed him about on January 6, and, as he had done previously, expressed his disgust for the allegations and strongly denied them. He said he was considering ordering me to investigate the alleged incident to prove it didn’t happen. I replied that he should give that careful thought because it might create a narrative that we were investigating him personally, which we weren’t, and because it was very difficult to prove a negative. He said he would think about it and asked me to think about it.”

On a March 30 call

“On the morning of March 30, the President called me at the FBI. He described the Russia investigation as “a cloud” that was impairing his ability to act on behalf of the country. He said he had nothing to do with Russia, had not been involved with hookers in Russia, and had always assumed he was being recorded when in Russia. He asked what we could do to “lift the cloud.” I responded that we were investigating the matter as quickly as we could, and that there would be great benefit, if we didn’t find anything, to our having done the work well. He agreed, but then re-emphasized the problems this was causing him.”

On an April 11 call

“On the morning of April 11, the President called me and asked what I had done about his request that I “get out” that he is not personally under investigation. I replied that I had passed his request to the Acting Deputy Attorney General, but I had not heard back. He replied that “the cloud” was getting in the way of his ability to do his job. He said that perhaps he would have his people reach out to the Acting Deputy Attorney General. I said that was the way his request should be handled. I said the White House Counsel should contact the leadership of DOJ to make the request, which was the traditional channel.”

3. He asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions to “prevent any future communication” between just he and the president. He did not tell Sessions what the president said about Michael Flynn. 

“Shortly afterwards, I spoke with Attorney General Sessions in person to pass along the President’s concerns about leaks. I took the opportunity to implore the Attorney General to prevent any future direct communication between the President and me. I told the AG that what had just happened – him being asked to leave while the FBI Director, who reports to the AG, remained behind – was inappropriate and should never happen. He did not reply. For the reasons discussed above, I did not mention that the President broached the FBI’s potential investigation of General Flynn.”

Below is Comey’s opening statement to the Senate committee.

 


There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

 
 

 

@Y100SanAntonio Instagram

Certa Pro

Certa Pro painting a project for J.R.