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Frequent teen technology use linked to ADHD symptoms, study finds

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood, affecting millions of American children annually, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

>> On AJC.com: Does my child have ADHD? Things to know about the condition

While the causes and risk factors of the disorder are unknown, researchers are studying how brain injury, exposure to lead and other environmental factors during pregnancy, alcohol/tobacco use during pregnancy, premature delivery and low birth weight may be linked to ADHD.

But new research published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests frequent technology use among teens may also lead to common ADHD symptoms.

>> On AJC.com: Number of young women using ADHD medicine up by 700 percent, CDC says

The new study out of the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Southern California features data on 2,587 15- and 16-year-olds in 10 Los Angeles County high schools.

Researchers assessed the students’ self-reported high-frequency use of 14 different digital media activities, such as social media, texting, video streaming or online chatrooms during a 24-month follow-up.

Approximately 9.5 percent of the children who reported frequent use of half of the platforms and 10.5 percent who reported using all 14 platforms frequently showed new signs and symptoms of ADHD.

>> Read more trending news 

Compared to others, students who reported using multiple types of digital media multiple times a day were about twice as likely to report new ADHD symptoms over the 24-month follow-up.

Still, about 4.6 percent of the students who were not frequent users of any digital activity also showed symptoms.

“Among adolescents followed up over 2 years, there was a statistically significant but modest association between higher frequency of digital media use and subsequent symptoms of ADHD,” researchers concluded. 

But that doesn’t necessarily mean digital media use causes ADHD. “Further research is needed to determine whether this association is causal,” study authors wrote.

Read the full study at jamanetwork.com.

Baby found dead after mom left him home alone for 10 hours while she worked, police say

An Arizona mother is in jail after police said she went to work and left her 1-year-old son alone in their apartment, where he was found dead 10 hours later.

>> Missing baby found dead near slough after 5-day search

According to court documents obtained by KTVK, Donielle Joyce King, 32, of Phoenix, was arrested and charged with child abuse after first responders found the boy unresponsive Tuesday afternoon. 

King told investigators that she left the baby at home about 6:20 a.m. Tuesday before dropping off her other children at day care and going to work, the probable cause statement said. She claimed the baby could not go to day care because he "had open sores," court documents said. She also reportedly told investigators that a friend was supposed to babysit but never showed up.

>> Read more trending news 

King said she came back home at 4:15 p.m. and found the baby unresponsive on a mattress, investigators said. She said she performed CPR on the child as her daughter called 911, court documents said.

The baby, who reportedly had several bruises, was pronounced dead about 4:47 p.m., court documents said.

King is being held on a $50,000 bond.

Read more here.

1 dead, suspect in custody when hostage situation unfolds at Los Angeles Trader Joe’s, officials say

One woman is dead and a suspect in custody after dozens of people were held hostage Saturday during a standoff at a Los Angeles Trader Joe’s supermarket.

Here are the latest updates:

Update 6:05 a.m. EDT July 22: Trader Joe’s has released a statement about Saturday’s deadly standoff in Los Angeles.

“Our hearts are broken over what happened today,” read the statement obtained by KNBC. “This has been an incredible trauma, and our thoughts are with our Crew Members and customers. Our focus is on doing whatever we can to support them at this time. We appreciate everything Los Angeles law enforcement did to ensure an end to this ordeal.”

Original report: A man crashed a car and ran into a Los Angeles grocery store Sunday afternoon and took hostages during a standoff with police, authorities said. 

>> Read more trending news

The man was taken into custody after a tense standoff with police. 

A hostage was killed during the incident, the Associated Press reported. 

The incident started with the shooting of an older and younger woman in a residential area around 1:30 p.m., Los Angeles Police officer Mike Lopez told CNN.

The shooter then fled in a Toyota Camry and crashed at a Trader Joe’s, before running into the store.

"We can confirm that there is an active barricaded suspect within a #TraderJoes in #Silverlake. An active tac-alert has been declared to ensure all resources necessary will be available. Please continue to stay clear of the area," Los Angeles police tweeted.

A 20-year-old woman was taken to a hospital and is in fair condition, CNN reported

Video shows police carrying shields and ushering out a man who has his hands raised. A person who appears to be injured was carried off, and other people could be seen climbing out of the store down a rope ladder. 

President Donald Trump and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti have tweeted about the standoff. 

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Texas woman accused of sending meth to convicted killer, police say

A Texas woman is behind bars after police say she tried to send meth to a convicted killer.

According to KFDX, Sara Elizabeth Russell, 29, of Katy, was charged Thursday with one count of prohibited substance in a correctional facility after mailroom employees at the James V. Allred Unit prison found methamphetamine – and instructions on how to hide it – inside a card. 

>> Read more trending news 

Authorities said Russell was trying to send the drugs to inmate Jason Burkett, who was convicted of murder for his part in the 2001 deaths of a Texas woman and two teens, the Houston Chronicle reported

KFDX reported that investigators believe Burkett "mailed the card to Russell with pre-arranged directions to put meth in it, then have it returned to him." Burkett reportedly told investigators that he sent the card to Russell but didn't ask her to send the drugs.

Russell is being held on $10,000 bond. 

Read more here or here.

Happy 5th birthday, Prince George! Kate Middleton, Prince William share sweet photo of oldest son

Someone looks very happy to be turning 5.

Kensington Palace shared an adorable photo of a smiling Prince George, the oldest child of Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, on Saturday, one day before the pint-sized royal's birthday.

>> Prince Louis' christening portraits revealed: Kate Middleton, royal family stun in new photos

"The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to share a new photograph of Prince George to mark his fifth birthday – thank you everyone for your lovely messages," the palace tweeted along with the photo, taken by Matt Porteous.

>> See the photo here

The tweet quickly racked up 57,000 likes and 6,500 shares in 10 hours.

>> PHOTOS: Prince Louis christened

Take a look at his previous birthday portraits below:

>> Read more trending news 

Remains of woman missing since 2016 found in Washington state

The remains of a Washington state woman who was missing for years was found near Snohomish in May this year, King County sheriff’s officials said Thursday. 

>> Watch the news report here

The remains have been identified as Jamie Haggard.

Haggard was reported missing in June 2016. 

Officials said the remains were found near Downes Road and Fales Road on May 9. Deputies said a crew cleaning up roadside litter found the remains near a suitcase and blanket.

>> PREVIOUSLY ON KIRO7.com: Sheriff: No remains found after searching missing woman's backyard

KIRO-TV’s Deedee Sun learned from the King County Sheriff’s Office on Friday that a crew picking up trash along SR522 found Haggard’s body inside a suitcase but almost missed the crucial discovery. 

“A road crew found it; it was on the side of a road. And they put the suitcase up to get it picked up by a dump truck. Just prior to the dump truck picking it up, they opened it, and that’s when they found remains inside,” said Sgt. Ryan Abbot, with the King County Sheriff’s Office.

>> PREVIOUSLY ON KIRO7.com: VIDEO: Deputies searching yard, home of missing Kenmore woman

Her cause of death was homicidal violence, authorities said.

Search crews combed the area near where her body was found looking for more evidence that could lead to Haggard’s killer. 

"This is a horrible case, very tragic. She had two daughters, a family that cares a lot about her. So this is heartbreaking. To get a little bit of closure, to find at least her remains – but we still have a lot of work to do because we still have to find out who is responsible for this,” Abbott said.

>> Read more trending news 

Here’s a timeline of events:

  • June 2016: Jamie Haggard, 27, is reported missing
  • July 2016: Investigators search backyard of her Kenmore home 
  • May 2017: Tips lead investigators to again excavate backyard of Kenmore home, but find nothing
  • May 2018: Road crews find body near SR522 in Maltby
  • July 2018: Body identified through DNA as Jamie Haggard and death is ruled a homicide  

If you have information on Haggard's death, you're asked to call police at (206) 296-3311.

Read more here.

Veteran's American flag stolen; now a heartbreaking plea to get it back

The sign says, “Please return my flag, sentimental to me. I brought it back from Iraq. The bottom four stripes have my buddy’s blood on them.” 

“This was very important to him,” said Kim Phillips, who lives in Tacoma, Washington. She said veteran Nolan Gomez, also of Tacoma, was doing some yard work when someone stole his American flag. 

The flag usually flies on the back of Gomez's truck, but he took it down while using the truck to do some work and stood the flag up in a cone.

>> See the photos here

“He went to get gas or whatever, came back, it was gone,” Phillips said. 

Only after it went missing did she learn its significance.

“That came back from the war with him and it was very important to him and that was his buddy’s blood on the bottom,” Phillips said, tearing up. 

She said her family is also military, and her brother served in the front lines during the Vietnam War. 

She decided she had to help make the sign in hopes whoever took it would see it. 

Her neighbor took a photo of that sign and posted it in a Pierce County community page, where it’s been shared hundreds of times. 

“It’s crazy, everybody is mad,” said friend Jill Thurman. 

>> Read more trending news 

Since the post, multiple families have stepped up, offering their families’ American flags to the veteran. 

“Yesterday, four boys came over, they folded it up and said this is our uncle’s flag, and we want to give it to you to replace the one you lost,” Phillips said. 

They say it’s something incredible that came out of something heartbreaking, but they’re still hoping to help that veteran get his flag back.

“That’s defending us, all of us, our freedom. And he was injured in the war. So it’s another reason to get it back to him. If anyone knows where to look,” Phillips said.

Boat breaks free, crashes onto truck towing it, officials say

A large boat broke free from its trailer Saturday and landed on top of the truck towing it. 

>> Read more trending news

Rescue crews responded to the unusual scene at 5:38 p.m. to secure the boat and treat victims for injuries, the Union Hill Fire Department said on Facebook

The victims, whose identities were not released, were treated at the scene.

Trump Chicken balloon to fly in San Francisco Sunday

Move over Baby Trump balloon, an inflatable Trump Chicken is already making appearances in America.

>> Read more trending news

The 33-foot tall inflatable caricature of President Donald Trump will be seen Sunday when it’s attached to a boat and sails along the shores of San Francisco.

The chicken, dressed in a shirt with “Prisoner 45” emblazoned across it, first floated April 15, 2017, at the San Francisco Tax March, according to KRON.

Since then, the Trump Chicken has been seen at the White House in February and affixed to a boat and floated around Alcatraz during President’s Day weekend. 

The group behind the inflatable started a GoFundMe account to cover the boat rental costs. 

Earlier this month, a man in New Jersey started a campaign to bring the Baby Trump balloon seen floating during the president’s trip to the United Kingdom to the United States to fly above Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster. 

That GoFundMe has raised more than $23,000. Organizers expect to receive it in about four weeks.

11-year-old graduates Florida college 

When William Maillis was 2-years-old, he learned simple mathematical equations. At 4 he was on to algebra.

>> Read more trending news

He was declared a genius when he was 5 by an Ohio State University psychologist. At 9, he graduated high school.

Maillis, now 11, turned the tassel on his mortarboard Saturday as he graduated with his associates degree from St. Petersburg College. He plans to start on his bachelor’s degree next month at the University of South Florida, the Tampa Bay Times reported

His goal is to have his Ph.D. at 18.

"I want to be an astrophysicist," Maillis told BayNews9. "I want to prove to the world that God does exist through science."

World War II veteran awarded Prisoner of War medal after 73 years 

During World War II, Ralph G. Rumsey of Woodstock was a prisoner of war in Germany for six months. After struggling with his wartime experiences for 73 years, he’s been awarded a Prisoner of War Medal, gaining the recognition he thought might never come. 

At 96, Rumsey said he’s finally feeling some sense of closure.

He’s not satisfied yet, however; now, he wants to put the focus on other veterans.

“I always wanted to be able to help veterans,” Rumsey said. He hopes to support other veterans in tackling the issues they face, particularly psychological issues.

>> Read more trending news

Rumsey himself has struggled for decades with feeling a horrible itching sensation that he believes was caused by his time as a prisoner, when his bed and clothes were filled with bugs.

Despite his vivid memories of the war, his family said he never talks about it. Until two years ago, no one in his family knew that Rumsey had been a prisoner of war, according to his wife Ruby.

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson helped Rumsey secure the medal, and Isakson presented it to him at a special ceremony for his friends and family.

One of Rumsey’s friends, Christine Maza, was crucial in helping Rumsey get the medal. She met him when she was a hospice volunteer several years ago, and one day while taking him to the VA, she noticed a poster advertising the medal.

“He was so excited,” she recalled. Maza helped him submit the paperwork, but when it stalled at the VA, she called Isakson’s office, remembering how he had helped her father, also a veteran. Isakson made it happen, she said.

“I’m just happy that Ralph is finally getting what is long overdue,” Maza continued. “He’s just been sinking. This really revived him.”

Rumsey’s stepdaughter, Jean Thomas, also believes that the medal will help Rumsey psychologically. “I’m so happy for him and pleased,” she commented.

At the ceremony, Rumsey was in high spirits, eager to share stories of his experiences in the war, both good and bad. Though he remembers the bug infestation in the prison clearly, he also recalled the way Paris lit up at night in; the days he spent there after he was released.

When Isakson walked into the room, Rumsey joked that Isakson was a “youngster” compared to him. 

With a laugh, Isakson agreed. “I’ve only been here 73 years, you’re 96!”

As Rumsey received the medal, many of his friends and family shed tears.

“Thank you for putting up with the Germans for a couple of months in captivity, but in the end, you won and they lost, and that’s all that matters,” Isakson told Rumsey.

Georgia inmates in solitary confinement at 'grave risk of harm,' expert says

Craig Haney, hired to assess conditions in the solitary confinement unit at the Georgia Diagnostic and Classification Prison, has visited some of the nation’s most dangerous prisons, but nothing could prepare him for what he witnessed on the E Wing.

>> Read more trending news

The atmosphere was “as chaotic and out-of-control as any such unit I have seen in decades of conducting such evaluations,” he wrote. “When I entered this housing unit I was met with a cacophony of prisoner screams and cries for help. The noise was deafening and there was the smell of smoke in the air, as if someone had set a fire sometime earlier in the day.”

Such “draconian”conditions at the Jackson prison’s special management unit, which houses up to 192 prisoners, have created some of the most “psychologically traumatized” inmates he’s ever assessed, Haney wrote in a blistering report, released this week in its entirety.

“They are at grave risk of harm,” he said. “That psychological harm may be irreversible and even fatal.”

A spokeswoman with the Department of Corrections declined comment, citing pending litigation.

Haney, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, specializes in the psychological effects of imprisonment and consequences of solitary confinement. He was hired by the Southern Center for Human Rights, a leading advocate for criminal justice reform, after a prisoner filed a federal lawsuit claiming inhumane treatment within the GDC isolation unit. Similar suits from three other prisoners followed.

At every turn, the solitary unit — created to house the prison’s most dangerous and destructive inmates— exceeds the deprivation seen in similar solitary or “Supermax” facilities, Haney said. They are not only deprived of physical contact, but verbal communication is virtually impossible, the report found. Even visual contact is fleeting, as prisoners are confined by solid metal doors instead of bars. Even the small “windows,” on the cell doors and in the rear of the cell, are covered by thick metal sheets.

Prisoners can’t see out; natural air and sunlight can’t seep in.

“The prisoners are in essence hermetically sealed inside their cells for the extended periods in which they are confined there,” Haney reported.

Conditions throughout the unit were “unusually severe,” said Haney. Prisoners are locked in their 7 x 13.5-feet cells for all but five hours a week, when they are allowed outside exercise time.

Those five hours are divided into two sessions and spent within a caged outdoor cell, paved with concrete and surrounded by institutional facilities — more industrial than natural, Haney notes.

“Dangerously” high level of mentally ill prisoners in isolation

Housing just one mentally ill prisoner within the solitary unit would be problematic, Haney said.

At GDC, 70 of the 180 prisoners currently in isolation qualify as mentally ill.

“I do not believe there is any possible justification for housing such a high number of mentally ill prisoners in solitary confinement, especially not in a unit as harsh and severe as the Georgia SMU.”

And that’s not including prisoners in the unit who Haney, after reviewing the medical records of all 180 inmates, said exhibited serious mental problems. Two such prisoners committed suicide in 2017, he concludes. (Specific information about the prisoners is redacted.)

One, incarcerated since 2002, had an unstable childhood and was in need of mental help, his father wrote on a social history questionnaire. A mental health referral form from 2009 stated the prisoner had reported hearing voices for more than a year and had a history of treatment for anxiety, depression and multiple personalities. In 2015, he was moved to the special management unit.

He eventually hung himself with a sheet tied to a lighting fixture. His body was “stiff and cold … suggesting that officers had not checked on him in some time,” Haney wrote.

Prisoners with such pre-existing conditions “are likely to suffer greatly and deteriorate badly in solitary confinement,” the report states. “When their suffering and deterioration is ignored and they are retained in these dangerously harsh and deprived conditions, the consequences can be fatal.”

The solitary trap

The isolation unit is supposed to operate within an incentive system; getting out is dependent on the prisoners’ behavior.

But Haney’s report found that malfunctions in the Tier III program used at GDC are often just as responsible for keeping prisoners in solitary for exceedingly long periods. The requirements for advancement out of the unit are often unrealistic and dispensed arbitrarily, Haney said.

A lack of bed space is another persistent problem, according to the report. The unit’s chief of security, Dwain Williams, corroborated this in a deposition, testifying that prisoners are often held in more restrictive quarters because the facility can’t find room elsewhere.

“Thus, prisoners often languish at the lowest and most deprived level in the system (and the levels at which they are at most risk of harm) not because of their behavior but because the prison cannot house them where they are supposed to be,” Haney wrote.

Prisoners told Haney they often did not know what they needed to do to advance out of solitary confinement.

“I’ve been here almost two years,” said one prisoner, whose name was redacted. “I don’t know how to get out. It’s supposed to be a six-month program but nobody has a release date. You only have a start date.”

Typically prisoners spend a staggering three to four years in isolation at GDC; nearly 20 percent of the inmates had been retained for six years or more.

Haney said since 2010 it’s become increasingly difficult to win transfer out of solitary.

“Instead, once there, it looks as if prisoners are hard-pressed to secure their release,” he said.

Nowhere is it worse than the E Wing, the most restrictive portion of the special management unit. Most suffer from poor mental health.

Prisoners told Haney they are kept in their cells virtually around the clock, for weeks or months on end.

“We never get out of our cells,” one prisoner said. “We are caged in. They don’t even want to take us to shower.”

Haney described a palpable sense of hopelessness pervading through the E wing.

“We are just desperate, so we yell and scream for help,” another prisoner told him. “They ignore us or they beat us up.”

The report detailed four cases in which prisoners were battling serious mental health issues.

“Each man reported suffering greatly in this environment and manifested symptoms associated with psychological trauma and stress and the psychopathological effects of isolation,” Haney wrote. “None appear to have received the kind of in-depth mental health treatment that their serious psychiatric histories and conditions appeared to require.”

Study: Doctors give patients only seconds to explain reason for visit before interrupting

Have you ever felt rushed during a doctor’s visit? Most physicians don’t give their patients adequate time to explain the reason for their visit, according to a new study. 

>> Read more trending news

Researchers from the University of Florida, Gainesville, recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, to explore clinical encounters between doctors and their patients.

To do so, they assessed the initial few minutes of consultations between 112 patients and their medical practitioners between 2008 and 2015. The encounters they reviewed were videotaped in various clinics in the United States.

>> Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

The scientists observed whether doctors invited patients to set the agenda with questions such as “What can I do for you?” They also took notes on whether patients were interrupted while answering questions and in what manner.

After analyzing the results, they found that 36 percent of patients were able to set the agenda. However, they were interrupted 11 seconds on average after beginning their statements. Those who were not interrupted finished speaking after about six seconds. 

>> Medical errors kill almost as many as heart disease, doctors say

They said primary care doctors allowed more time than specialists as specialists generally know the purpose of a visit. 

“If done respectfully and with the patient’s best interest in mind, interruptions to the patient’s discourse may clarify or focus the conversation, and thus benefit patients,” co-author Singh Ospina said in a statement. “Yet, it seems rather unlikely that an interruption, even to clarify or focus, could be beneficial at the early stage in the encounter.”

>> Doctor burnout can cause major medical errors, study finds

While they are unclear why doctors don’t allow patients to speak longer, they believe time constraints, not enough training on how to communicate with patients and burnout may be factors. 

The scientists now hope to further explore their investigations on the ultimate experience of doctor visits and the outcomes. 

“Our results suggest that we are far from achieving patient-centered care,” she says. 

Officer killed by suspected drunken driver during funeral escort, Dallas police say

A 32-year veteran of the Dallas Police Department died early Saturday after he was hit by a suspected drunken driver during a funeral escort, authorities said.

>> Read more trending news

Senior Cpl. Earl “Jamie” Givens died early Saturday while he and other officers were escorting the body of Senior Cpl. Tyrone Andrews from Laurel Land Funeral Home to East Texas, police said. Andrews died of cancer, The Dallas Morning News reported.

Givens was stopped Saturday morning with his motorcycle’s emergency lights on when he was struck by a fast-moving Kia Sportage, authorities said. Givens, who was assigned to DPD’s traffic unit in 2012, was blocking traffic to an Interstate 20 on-ramp when he was hit, according to police. 

Givens’ fellow officers rendered aid to him before the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department arrived at the scene. However, police said, he was pronounced dead after he was taken to the Baylor University Medical Center.

The driver of the Kia Sportage, whose name was not released, struck a concrete divider and stopped, according to officials. The 25-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated.

Authorities continue to investigate the incident.

Dallas police Chief Renee Hall asked for the public’s prayers Saturday during a news conference.

“Keep the Givens family in your prayers,” she said. “Keep the Dallas Police Department in your prayers. Keep the city of Dallas in your prayers.”

Police search for man accused of sucker-punching a customer at Walmart

Police are searching for a person of interest in an assault at a Georgia Walmart where a man said he was sucker-punched.

>> Read more trending news

The shopper said the person of interest approached him in an aisle at the Covington Walmart and asked if he was “looking for something with sugar” before striking him from behind, according to the police incident report obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The person of interest allegedly struck the shopper a few more times before leaving the store along with another man, the report said.

Covington police released a picture of the man on their Facebook page, along with a photo of someone described as the person of interest’s friend. The person of interest wore a white shirt, and the “friend” had on a red shirt.

The two were seen leaving in a blue Chrysler 300 about midnight July 13, police said.

Men accused of stealing $8M in rare books, items from Pittsburgh library

Two men are facing charges of stealing or damaging more than $8 million in rare books and materials from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh over more than two decades.

>> Read more trending news

Investigators on Friday charged Greg Priore and John Schulman with the crimes, alleging the two men worked together to remove the items from the Oliver Room. 

According to the criminal complaint, Priore worked as the manager and sole archivist of the library's Oliver Room, which houses rare books and items, for 25 years before being fired in June 2017. Schulman is the co-owner of Caliban Book Shop in Oakland, which specializes in rare books.

>> On WPXI.com: Oakland library investigating multimillion-dollar theft of rare collection

The Oliver Room closed more than a year ago once authorities discovered the thefts.

Priore first contacted Schulman about the scheme in the late 1990s, according to the criminal complaint. Priore allegedly told police he made between $500 and $3,000 for items he stole and gave to Schulman to sell.

At one point, Priore allegedly told investigators, "I should have never done this. I loved that room, my whole working life, and greed came over me. I did it, but Schulman spurred me on."

Carnegie Library spokesperson Suzanne Thinnes released a statement to WPXI news reporter Aaron Martin

We are grateful the investigation into the Oliver Room theft has resulted in arrests, however we are deeply disappointed that at the center of this case are two people who had close, long standing relationships with the Library. We look forward to the appropriate individuals being held accountable to the fullest extent of the law. We will continue to cooperate with the DA’s office and deeply appreciate their efforts to recover the stolen materials. The District Attorney will release information as appropriate as the case progresses through legal proceedings. We would like to thank our community for their support throughout this lengthy and complex investigation. We have been asked not to comment further until legal proceedings are complete. 

Both Priore and Schulman are facing numerous charges including theft and conspiracy.

Officers responding to noise complaint end up in dance-off with kids

Barnstable police officers found themselves in an unexpected competition on Thursday while responding to a noise complaint.

The department posted a video on their Facebook page of an impromptu dance-off that the officers had with children after responding to the complaint on Spring Street in Hyannis.

>> Read more trending news

Raphael Morales sent in the video. He said a noise complaint had been sent in to police as he was teaching the kids about a viral dance to the song "In My Feelings" by Drake. 

The officers eventually got called again, and when they drove by 15 minutes later, Morales said the dance-off challenge was put on the table.

The initial challenge then led to the officers challenging the kids, with ice cream as a reward.

Toddler drowns in babysitter's pool, twin brother hospitalized, deputies say

A young girl drowned and her twin brother was hospitalized Friday after they were found in a swimming pool while staying with a babysitter in Tennessee, according to Knox County sheriff’s deputies.

>> Read more trending news

The children, who were identified only as nearly 2-year-old twins, were staying at a home on Fox Lonas Road in West Knox County when the incident happened, deputies said. Their babysitter told authorities that she began to look for the twins after another child arrived at her home around 10 a.m. Friday.

She said she found them in the deep end of a swimming pool, deputies said.

First responders attempted to revive the children and rushed them to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital in critical condition, WBIR reported.

Deputies said the girl was pronounced dead at the hospital. The boy was on life support Friday.

Authorities are investigating the incident.

Marine son stationed overseas surprises firefighter father for his birthday

A Marine stationed in Norway traveled around the globe to surprise his father in South Carolina on his birthday.

>> Read more trending news

The two reunited in an emotional moment at Friday’s celebration for Perry Clanton, an assistant volunteer fire chief, in Lancaster, South Carolina. Family and friends gathered for the occasion at the Buford Fire and Rescue building.

Clanton thought he was doing an interview with WSOCTV, but instead, his son, Cpl. Matthew Clanton walked into the room.

“I’m so proud of him, to have him home,” Perry Clanton said. “No one told me anyone would be here. (It) truly is a gift.”

Perry Clanton was also honored for his work in the community with diabetes. His father-in-law died from complications of diabetes a few years ago, and Clanton was diagnosed with diabetes in 2015. He lost more than 100 pounds to get healthy and urged others to do the same.

>> See more on WSOCTV.com

“He's always been there for me,” Matthew Clanton said. “If this is one thing I can do for him, to be here for him, he’s one of my big heroes that I look up to.”

Matthew Clanton gave his father a plaque, with a proclamation calling the day “Perry Clanton Day."

“When you finally reach that moment, get diabetes managed, you want to share that,” Perry Clanton said.

'I'm just lost': Relatives talk about losing 9 family members in duck boat accident

A metro Atlanta man told WSBTV that he is “just lost” after losing nine of his relatives in a duck boat accident on Missouri’s Table Rock Lake on Thursday.

>> Read more trending news

“I don’t know. I can’t place it. I can’t imagine it,” Gary Coleman told WSBTV. “We’ve had a death in the family — one or two. Not a whole family at one time.”

Gary Coleman and his wife, Carolyn Coleman, who live in Riverdale, said it doesn’t seem real.

There were 11 Colemans on the duck boat and only two survived, Gary Coleman said. He said they were on an annual family trip. WSBTV learned the family wasn’t supposed to be on that specific duck boat, but a ticket mix-up is why they were on board.

>> 9 members of one family among 17 killed in duck boat accident on lake in Branson, Missouri

Early Thursday, he released a photo of eight of the relatives who died in the accident. Gary Coleman said everyone in the photo except for the woman on the far left, Tia, and the teenage boy on the far right, Donovan, died in the accident, according to WSBTV.

“I’ve just been looking at this picture all day,” he told the news station.

The family is from Indianapolis. Gary said the deceased include two of his brothers, Butch and Ray, his niece Angela, his nephew Glen and his grandnephews Maxwell and Reese. Butch’s wife, Belinda, also died, as did two young children, who Gary Coleman didn’t name. 

Tia and Donovan Coleman were the two survivors.

>> Captain said not to worry about life jackets before deadly duck boat crash, survivor says

The accident killed 17 people and injured 14 when the boat capsized after a strong line of thunderstorms moved through the area about 7 p.m. Thursday.

Officials said the victims range in age from 1 to 70 years old.

Gary and Carolyn Coleman question why the boat went out at all.

>> Tourist attraction in Georgia suspends duck boats after Missouri tragedy

“My biggest question is why did that boat go out? They had thunderstorm warning all day coming through Kansas and Missouri,” Gary Coleman said.

Though the loss of nine family members is devastating, they’re trying to find solace through their faith.

“We’re just going to trust and keep faith in God that he can soothe our spirits because this isn’t easy,” Carolyn Coleman said.

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Certa Pro

Certa Pro painting a project for J.R.