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Boat breaks free, crashes onto truck towing it, officials say

A large boat broke free from its trailer Saturday and landed on top of the truck towing it. 

>> Read more trending news

Rescue crews responded to the unusual scene at 5:38 p.m. to secure the boat and treat victims for injuries, the Union Hill Fire Department said on Facebook

The victims, whose identities were not released, were treated at the scene.

1 dead, suspect in custody when hostage situation unfolds at Los Angeles Trader Joe’s, officials say

A man crashed a car and ran into a Los Angeles grocery store Sunday afternoon and took hostages during a standoff with police, authorities said. 

>> Read more trending news

The man was taken into custody after a tense standoff with police.

A hostage was killed during the incident, the Associated Press reported. 

The incident started with the shooting of an older and younger woman in a residential area around 1:30 p.m., Los Angeles Police officer Mike Lopez told CNN.

The shooter then fled in a Toyota Camry and crashed at a Trader Joe’s, before running into the store.

"We can confirm that there is an active barricaded suspect within a #TraderJoes in #Silverlake. An active tac-alert has been declared to ensure all resources necessary will be available. Please continue to stay clear of the area," Los Angeles police tweeted.

A 20-year-old woman was taken to a hospital and is in fair condition, CNN reported

Video shows police carrying shields and ushering out a man who has his hands raised. A person who appears to be injured was carried off, and other people could be seen climbing out of the store down a rope ladder. 

President Donald Trump and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti have tweeted about the standoff. 

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Trump Chicken balloon to fly in San Francisco Sunday

Move over Baby Trump balloon, an inflatable Trump Chicken is already making appearances in America.

>> Read more trending news

The 33-foot tall inflatable caricature of President Donald Trump will be seen Sunday when it’s attached to a boat and sails along the shores of San Francisco.

The chicken, dressed in a shirt with “Prisoner 45” emblazoned across it, first floated April 15, 2017, at the San Francisco Tax March, according to KRON.

Since then, the Trump Chicken has been seen at the White House in February and affixed to a boat and floated around Alcatraz during President’s Day weekend. 

The group behind the inflatable started a GoFundMe account to cover the boat rental costs. 

Earlier this month, a man in New Jersey started a campaign to bring the Baby Trump balloon seen floating during the president’s trip to the United Kingdom to the United States to fly above Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster. 

That GoFundMe has raised more than $23,000. Organizers expect to receive it in about four weeks.

11-year-old graduates Florida college 

When William Maillis was 2-years-old, he learned simple mathematical equations. At 4 he was on to algebra.

>> Read more trending news

He was declared a genius when he was 5 by an Ohio State University psychologist. At 9, he graduated high school.

Maillis, now 11, turned the tassel on his mortarboard Saturday as he graduated with his associates degree from St. Petersburg College. He plans to start on his bachelor’s degree next month at the University of South Florida, the Tampa Bay Times reported

His goal is to have his Ph.D. at 18.

"I want to be an astrophysicist," Maillis told BayNews9. "I want to prove to the world that God does exist through science."

World War II veteran awarded Prisoner of War medal after 73 years 

During World War II, Ralph G. Rumsey of Woodstock was a prisoner of war in Germany for six months. After struggling with his wartime experiences for 73 years, he’s been awarded a Prisoner of War Medal, gaining the recognition he thought might never come. 

At 96, Rumsey said he’s finally feeling some sense of closure.

He’s not satisfied yet, however; now, he wants to put the focus on other veterans.

“I always wanted to be able to help veterans,” Rumsey said. He hopes to support other veterans in tackling the issues they face, particularly psychological issues.

>> Read more trending news

Rumsey himself has struggled for decades with feeling a horrible itching sensation that he believes was caused by his time as a prisoner, when his bed and clothes were filled with bugs.

Despite his vivid memories of the war, his family said he never talks about it. Until two years ago, no one in his family knew that Rumsey had been a prisoner of war, according to his wife Ruby.

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson helped Rumsey secure the medal, and Isakson presented it to him at a special ceremony for his friends and family.

One of Rumsey’s friends, Christine Maza, was crucial in helping Rumsey get the medal. She met him when she was a hospice volunteer several years ago, and one day while taking him to the VA, she noticed a poster advertising the medal.

“He was so excited,” she recalled. Maza helped him submit the paperwork, but when it stalled at the VA, she called Isakson’s office, remembering how he had helped her father, also a veteran. Isakson made it happen, she said.

“I’m just happy that Ralph is finally getting what is long overdue,” Maza continued. “He’s just been sinking. This really revived him.”

Rumsey’s stepdaughter, Jean Thomas, also believes that the medal will help Rumsey psychologically. “I’m so happy for him and pleased,” she commented.

At the ceremony, Rumsey was in high spirits, eager to share stories of his experiences in the war, both good and bad. Though he remembers the bug infestation in the prison clearly, he also recalled the way Paris lit up at night in; the days he spent there after he was released.

When Isakson walked into the room, Rumsey joked that Isakson was a “youngster” compared to him. 

With a laugh, Isakson agreed. “I’ve only been here 73 years, you’re 96!”

As Rumsey received the medal, many of his friends and family shed tears.

“Thank you for putting up with the Germans for a couple of months in captivity, but in the end, you won and they lost, and that’s all that matters,” Isakson told Rumsey.

Georgia inmates in solitary confinement at 'grave risk of harm,' expert says

Craig Haney, hired to assess conditions in the solitary confinement unit at the Georgia Diagnostic and Classification Prison, has visited some of the nation’s most dangerous prisons, but nothing could prepare him for what he witnessed on the E Wing.

>> Read more trending news

The atmosphere was “as chaotic and out-of-control as any such unit I have seen in decades of conducting such evaluations,” he wrote. “When I entered this housing unit I was met with a cacophony of prisoner screams and cries for help. The noise was deafening and there was the smell of smoke in the air, as if someone had set a fire sometime earlier in the day.”

Such “draconian”conditions at the Jackson prison’s special management unit, which houses up to 192 prisoners, have created some of the most “psychologically traumatized” inmates he’s ever assessed, Haney wrote in a blistering report, released this week in its entirety.

“They are at grave risk of harm,” he said. “That psychological harm may be irreversible and even fatal.”

A spokeswoman with the Department of Corrections declined comment, citing pending litigation.

Haney, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, specializes in the psychological effects of imprisonment and consequences of solitary confinement. He was hired by the Southern Center for Human Rights, a leading advocate for criminal justice reform, after a prisoner filed a federal lawsuit claiming inhumane treatment within the GDC isolation unit. Similar suits from three other prisoners followed.

At every turn, the solitary unit — created to house the prison’s most dangerous and destructive inmates— exceeds the deprivation seen in similar solitary or “Supermax” facilities, Haney said. They are not only deprived of physical contact, but verbal communication is virtually impossible, the report found. Even visual contact is fleeting, as prisoners are confined by solid metal doors instead of bars. Even the small “windows,” on the cell doors and in the rear of the cell, are covered by thick metal sheets.

Prisoners can’t see out; natural air and sunlight can’t seep in.

“The prisoners are in essence hermetically sealed inside their cells for the extended periods in which they are confined there,” Haney reported.

Conditions throughout the unit were “unusually severe,” said Haney. Prisoners are locked in their 7 x 13.5-feet cells for all but five hours a week, when they are allowed outside exercise time.

Those five hours are divided into two sessions and spent within a caged outdoor cell, paved with concrete and surrounded by institutional facilities — more industrial than natural, Haney notes.

“Dangerously” high level of mentally ill prisoners in isolation

Housing just one mentally ill prisoner within the solitary unit would be problematic, Haney said.

At GDC, 70 of the 180 prisoners currently in isolation qualify as mentally ill.

“I do not believe there is any possible justification for housing such a high number of mentally ill prisoners in solitary confinement, especially not in a unit as harsh and severe as the Georgia SMU.”

And that’s not including prisoners in the unit who Haney, after reviewing the medical records of all 180 inmates, said exhibited serious mental problems. Two such prisoners committed suicide in 2017, he concludes. (Specific information about the prisoners is redacted.)

One, incarcerated since 2002, had an unstable childhood and was in need of mental help, his father wrote on a social history questionnaire. A mental health referral form from 2009 stated the prisoner had reported hearing voices for more than a year and had a history of treatment for anxiety, depression and multiple personalities. In 2015, he was moved to the special management unit.

He eventually hung himself with a sheet tied to a lighting fixture. His body was “stiff and cold … suggesting that officers had not checked on him in some time,” Haney wrote.

Prisoners with such pre-existing conditions “are likely to suffer greatly and deteriorate badly in solitary confinement,” the report states. “When their suffering and deterioration is ignored and they are retained in these dangerously harsh and deprived conditions, the consequences can be fatal.”

The solitary trap

The isolation unit is supposed to operate within an incentive system; getting out is dependent on the prisoners’ behavior.

But Haney’s report found that malfunctions in the Tier III program used at GDC are often just as responsible for keeping prisoners in solitary for exceedingly long periods. The requirements for advancement out of the unit are often unrealistic and dispensed arbitrarily, Haney said.

A lack of bed space is another persistent problem, according to the report. The unit’s chief of security, Dwain Williams, corroborated this in a deposition, testifying that prisoners are often held in more restrictive quarters because the facility can’t find room elsewhere.

“Thus, prisoners often languish at the lowest and most deprived level in the system (and the levels at which they are at most risk of harm) not because of their behavior but because the prison cannot house them where they are supposed to be,” Haney wrote.

Prisoners told Haney they often did not know what they needed to do to advance out of solitary confinement.

“I’ve been here almost two years,” said one prisoner, whose name was redacted. “I don’t know how to get out. It’s supposed to be a six-month program but nobody has a release date. You only have a start date.”

Typically prisoners spend a staggering three to four years in isolation at GDC; nearly 20 percent of the inmates had been retained for six years or more.

Haney said since 2010 it’s become increasingly difficult to win transfer out of solitary.

“Instead, once there, it looks as if prisoners are hard-pressed to secure their release,” he said.

Nowhere is it worse than the E Wing, the most restrictive portion of the special management unit. Most suffer from poor mental health.

Prisoners told Haney they are kept in their cells virtually around the clock, for weeks or months on end.

“We never get out of our cells,” one prisoner said. “We are caged in. They don’t even want to take us to shower.”

Haney described a palpable sense of hopelessness pervading through the E wing.

“We are just desperate, so we yell and scream for help,” another prisoner told him. “They ignore us or they beat us up.”

The report detailed four cases in which prisoners were battling serious mental health issues.

“Each man reported suffering greatly in this environment and manifested symptoms associated with psychological trauma and stress and the psychopathological effects of isolation,” Haney wrote. “None appear to have received the kind of in-depth mental health treatment that their serious psychiatric histories and conditions appeared to require.”

Study: Doctors give patients only seconds to explain reason for visit before interrupting

Have you ever felt rushed during a doctor’s visit? Most physicians don’t give their patients adequate time to explain the reason for their visit, according to a new study. 

>> Read more trending news

Researchers from the University of Florida, Gainesville, recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, to explore clinical encounters between doctors and their patients.

To do so, they assessed the initial few minutes of consultations between 112 patients and their medical practitioners between 2008 and 2015. The encounters they reviewed were videotaped in various clinics in the United States.

>> Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

The scientists observed whether doctors invited patients to set the agenda with questions such as “What can I do for you?” They also took notes on whether patients were interrupted while answering questions and in what manner.

After analyzing the results, they found that 36 percent of patients were able to set the agenda. However, they were interrupted 11 seconds on average after beginning their statements. Those who were not interrupted finished speaking after about six seconds. 

>> Medical errors kill almost as many as heart disease, doctors say

They said primary care doctors allowed more time than specialists as specialists generally know the purpose of a visit. 

“If done respectfully and with the patient’s best interest in mind, interruptions to the patient’s discourse may clarify or focus the conversation, and thus benefit patients,” co-author Singh Ospina said in a statement. “Yet, it seems rather unlikely that an interruption, even to clarify or focus, could be beneficial at the early stage in the encounter.”

>> Doctor burnout can cause major medical errors, study finds

While they are unclear why doctors don’t allow patients to speak longer, they believe time constraints, not enough training on how to communicate with patients and burnout may be factors. 

The scientists now hope to further explore their investigations on the ultimate experience of doctor visits and the outcomes. 

“Our results suggest that we are far from achieving patient-centered care,” she says. 

Officer killed by suspected drunken driver during funeral escort, Dallas police say

A 32-year veteran of the Dallas Police Department died early Saturday after he was hit by a suspected drunken driver during a funeral escort, authorities said.

>> Read more trending news

Senior Cpl. Earl “Jamie” Givens died early Saturday while he and other officers were escorting the body of Senior Cpl. Tyrone Andrews from Laurel Land Funeral Home to East Texas, police said. Andrews died of cancer, The Dallas Morning News reported.

Givens was stopped Saturday morning with his motorcycle’s emergency lights on when he was struck by a fast-moving Kia Sportage, authorities said. Givens, who was assigned to DPD’s traffic unit in 2012, was blocking traffic to an Interstate 20 on-ramp when he was hit, according to police. 

Givens’ fellow officers rendered aid to him before the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department arrived at the scene. However, police said, he was pronounced dead after he was taken to the Baylor University Medical Center.

The driver of the Kia Sportage, whose name was not released, struck a concrete divider and stopped, according to officials. The 25-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated.

Authorities continue to investigate the incident.

Dallas police Chief Renee Hall asked for the public’s prayers Saturday during a news conference.

“Keep the Givens family in your prayers,” she said. “Keep the Dallas Police Department in your prayers. Keep the city of Dallas in your prayers.”

Police search for man accused of sucker-punching a customer at Walmart

Police are searching for a person of interest in an assault at a Georgia Walmart where a man said he was sucker-punched.

>> Read more trending news

The shopper said the person of interest approached him in an aisle at the Covington Walmart and asked if he was “looking for something with sugar” before striking him from behind, according to the police incident report obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The person of interest allegedly struck the shopper a few more times before leaving the store along with another man, the report said.

Covington police released a picture of the man on their Facebook page, along with a photo of someone described as the person of interest’s friend. The person of interest wore a white shirt, and the “friend” had on a red shirt.

The two were seen leaving in a blue Chrysler 300 about midnight July 13, police said.

Men accused of stealing $8M in rare books, items from Pittsburgh library

Two men are facing charges of stealing or damaging more than $8 million in rare books and materials from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh over more than two decades.

>> Read more trending news

Investigators on Friday charged Greg Priore and John Schulman with the crimes, alleging the two men worked together to remove the items from the Oliver Room. 

According to the criminal complaint, Priore worked as the manager and sole archivist of the library's Oliver Room, which houses rare books and items, for 25 years before being fired in June 2017. Schulman is the co-owner of Caliban Book Shop in Oakland, which specializes in rare books.

>> On WPXI.com: Oakland library investigating multimillion-dollar theft of rare collection

The Oliver Room closed more than a year ago once authorities discovered the thefts.

Priore first contacted Schulman about the scheme in the late 1990s, according to the criminal complaint. Priore allegedly told police he made between $500 and $3,000 for items he stole and gave to Schulman to sell.

At one point, Priore allegedly told investigators, "I should have never done this. I loved that room, my whole working life, and greed came over me. I did it, but Schulman spurred me on."

Carnegie Library spokesperson Suzanne Thinnes released a statement to WPXI news reporter Aaron Martin

We are grateful the investigation into the Oliver Room theft has resulted in arrests, however we are deeply disappointed that at the center of this case are two people who had close, long standing relationships with the Library. We look forward to the appropriate individuals being held accountable to the fullest extent of the law. We will continue to cooperate with the DA’s office and deeply appreciate their efforts to recover the stolen materials. The District Attorney will release information as appropriate as the case progresses through legal proceedings. We would like to thank our community for their support throughout this lengthy and complex investigation. We have been asked not to comment further until legal proceedings are complete. 

Both Priore and Schulman are facing numerous charges including theft and conspiracy.

Officers responding to noise complaint end up in dance-off with kids

Barnstable police officers found themselves in an unexpected competition on Thursday while responding to a noise complaint.

The department posted a video on their Facebook page of an impromptu dance-off that the officers had with children after responding to the complaint on Spring Street in Hyannis.

>> Read more trending news

Raphael Morales sent in the video. He said a noise complaint had been sent in to police as he was teaching the kids about a viral dance to the song "In My Feelings" by Drake. 

The officers eventually got called again, and when they drove by 15 minutes later, Morales said the dance-off challenge was put on the table.

The initial challenge then led to the officers challenging the kids, with ice cream as a reward.

Toddler drowns in babysitter's pool, twin brother hospitalized, deputies say

A young girl drowned and her twin brother was hospitalized Friday after they were found in a swimming pool while staying with a babysitter in Tennessee, according to Knox County sheriff’s deputies.

>> Read more trending news

The children, who were identified only as nearly 2-year-old twins, were staying at a home on Fox Lonas Road in West Knox County when the incident happened, deputies said. Their babysitter told authorities that she began to look for the twins after another child arrived at her home around 10 a.m. Friday.

She said she found them in the deep end of a swimming pool, deputies said.

First responders attempted to revive the children and rushed them to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital in critical condition, WBIR reported.

Deputies said the girl was pronounced dead at the hospital. The boy was on life support Friday.

Authorities are investigating the incident.

Marine son stationed overseas surprises firefighter father for his birthday

A Marine stationed in Norway traveled around the globe to surprise his father in South Carolina on his birthday.

>> Read more trending news

The two reunited in an emotional moment at Friday’s celebration for Perry Clanton, an assistant volunteer fire chief, in Lancaster, South Carolina. Family and friends gathered for the occasion at the Buford Fire and Rescue building.

Clanton thought he was doing an interview with WSOCTV, but instead, his son, Cpl. Matthew Clanton walked into the room.

“I’m so proud of him, to have him home,” Perry Clanton said. “No one told me anyone would be here. (It) truly is a gift.”

Perry Clanton was also honored for his work in the community with diabetes. His father-in-law died from complications of diabetes a few years ago, and Clanton was diagnosed with diabetes in 2015. He lost more than 100 pounds to get healthy and urged others to do the same.

>> See more on WSOCTV.com

“He's always been there for me,” Matthew Clanton said. “If this is one thing I can do for him, to be here for him, he’s one of my big heroes that I look up to.”

Matthew Clanton gave his father a plaque, with a proclamation calling the day “Perry Clanton Day."

“When you finally reach that moment, get diabetes managed, you want to share that,” Perry Clanton said.

'I'm just lost': Relatives talk about losing 9 family members in duck boat accident

A metro Atlanta man told WSBTV that he is “just lost” after losing nine of his relatives in a duck boat accident on Missouri’s Table Rock Lake on Thursday.

>> Read more trending news

“I don’t know. I can’t place it. I can’t imagine it,” Gary Coleman told WSBTV. “We’ve had a death in the family — one or two. Not a whole family at one time.”

Gary Coleman and his wife, Carolyn Coleman, who live in Riverdale, said it doesn’t seem real.

There were 11 Colemans on the duck boat and only two survived, Gary Coleman said. He said they were on an annual family trip. WSBTV learned the family wasn’t supposed to be on that specific duck boat, but a ticket mix-up is why they were on board.

>> 9 members of one family among 17 killed in duck boat accident on lake in Branson, Missouri

Early Thursday, he released a photo of eight of the relatives who died in the accident. Gary Coleman said everyone in the photo except for the woman on the far left, Tia, and the teenage boy on the far right, Donovan, died in the accident, according to WSBTV.

“I’ve just been looking at this picture all day,” he told the news station.

The family is from Indianapolis. Gary said the deceased include two of his brothers, Butch and Ray, his niece Angela, his nephew Glen and his grandnephews Maxwell and Reese. Butch’s wife, Belinda, also died, as did two young children, who Gary Coleman didn’t name. 

Tia and Donovan Coleman were the two survivors.

>> Captain said not to worry about life jackets before deadly duck boat crash, survivor says

The accident killed 17 people and injured 14 when the boat capsized after a strong line of thunderstorms moved through the area about 7 p.m. Thursday.

Officials said the victims range in age from 1 to 70 years old.

Gary and Carolyn Coleman question why the boat went out at all.

>> Tourist attraction in Georgia suspends duck boats after Missouri tragedy

“My biggest question is why did that boat go out? They had thunderstorm warning all day coming through Kansas and Missouri,” Gary Coleman said.

Though the loss of nine family members is devastating, they’re trying to find solace through their faith.

“We’re just going to trust and keep faith in God that he can soothe our spirits because this isn’t easy,” Carolyn Coleman said.

Captain said not to worry about life jackets before deadly duck boat crash, survivor says

A woman who lost nine family members when a duck boat capsized in Missouri’s Table Rock Lake on Thursday said the captain of the boat told passengers not to worry about life jackets before the accident.

>> Read more trending news

Tia Coleman was one of the 11 members of the Coleman family to board the duck boat Thursday, according to WXIN-TV. She told the TV station that she and her nephew were the only survivors of their group.

“My heart is very heavy,” Coleman told WXIN-TV. “I lost all my children, my brother-in-law.”

>> 9 members of one family among 17 killed in duck boat accident on lake in Branson, Missouri

She said that her family members didn’t bother to grab life jackets because they were told by the boat’s captain that they wouldn’t need them.

“When it was time to grab them, it was too late,” she told WXIN-TV. “I believe that a lot of people could have been spared.”

Authorities said 17 people were killed and 14 others injured in the incident, including Coleman’s family members. The family had traveled to Branson for their annual road trip, according to The New York Times. Carolyn Coleman told the newspaper that the victims came from three generations of the Coleman family and included four young children.

>> Deadly duck tour boat crashes date back nearly two decades

The president of the company that owns Ride The Ducks Branson, Ripley Entertainment, told “CBS This Morning” that the boats have life jackets onboard but he added that passengers aren’t required by law to wear them. Jim Pattison said that, given the weather conditions, the boat “shouldn’t have been in the water.”

"Usually the lake is very placid and it's not a long tour, they go in and kind of around an island and back,” Pattison told “CBS This Morning” on Friday. “To the best of our knowledge – and we don't have a lot of information now – but it was a fast-moving storm that came out of basically nowhere.”

Authorities continue to investigate the circumstances leading to Thursday’s deadly incident.

Survey: Black millennials are more religious than other millennials

Black millennials are more religious than other members of their generation, according to a new analysis from Pew Research Center.

>> Read more trending news

The analysis, based on data from the Center’s 2014 Religious Landscape Study, revealed that 64 percent of black millennials are highly religious compared to 39 percent of nonblack millennials. Religious commitment was measured by a four-item scale which includes belief in God, self-described importance of religion, prayer and worship attendance.

More than half of black millennials (61 percent) said they pray daily compared to 39 percent of nonblack millennials, while 38 percent of black millennials said they attend religious services at least weekly compared to 25 percent of nonblack millennials. 

>> On MyAJC.com: Every Day Is Sunday: As atheism rises, nonbelievers find one another

Black millennials are also more likely to read scripture outside of religious services than nonblack millennials and 61 percent of black millennials said they feel a deep sense of spiritual peace and well-being at least weekly compared to 50 percent of nonblack millennials. 

Millennials as a whole (the generation born between 1981 and 1996) are generally less religious than other generations, according to a number of recent surveys from Pew Research Center. This pattern is also seen among black millennials when comparing them to older black Americans.

>> Are families taking religion out of Christmas?

Black millennials are less likely than older blacks to say they pray daily, attend religious service weekly or that religion is very important to them. They are also less likely than older blacks to read scripture outside of religious services or report a deep sense of spiritual peace and well-being at least weekly.

A previous analysis from Pew Center showed that older African Americans are also more likely than younger black adults to be associated with historically black Protestant churches -- 63 percent of the Silent Generation (born between 1928 and 1945) compared to 41 percent of black millennials.

Only one aspect of religion seems to transcend demographics. Respondents in all of these groups are about equally likely to report feeling a deep sense of wonder about the universe.

Trump: NFL players should be suspended for kneeling during anthem

President Donald Trump said Friday that NFL players who kneel during the national anthem should be suspended as team owners and the NFL Players Association agreed to halt the enforcement of rules regarding the new national anthem policy.

>> Read more trending news

Team owners approved the policy in May. It would require players to stand during the anthem or stay in the locker room or off-field while it’s being played. Players who violate the policy could face a fine.

>> NFL owners approve new national anthem policy, will fine teams that allow players to kneel

The decision to halt enforcement of the policy came after The Associated Press reported that Miami Dolphins players who protest on the field during the anthem could be suspended for up to four games.

>> NFL, players union agree to halt new anthem policy for now, seek resolution

“The NFL National Anthem Debate is alive and well again – can’t believe it!” Trump wrote Friday on Twitter.

“Isn’t it in contract that players must stand at attention, hand on heart? The $40,000,000 Commissioner must now make a stand. First time kneeling, out for game. Second time kneeling, out for season/no pay!”

There is no requirement that NFL players stand during the national anthem.

>> NFL Players Association files grievance over anthem policy

The president has consistently slammed players who have chosen to kneel during the anthem, framing the protest as un-American. Then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was the first to kneel during the anthem in a silent protest against police violence in 2016. The protest got mixed reactions, but other NFL players later followed Kaepernick’s lead to protest inequality.

>> Trump: NFL players who kneel ‘maybe shouldn’t be in the country’

Trump suggested last year that NFL team owners should fire players who refuse to stand during the anthem, telling a crowd in Alabama that “that’s a total disrespect for our heritage.” He told Fox News’ “Fox and Friends” last month that players who decide not to stand for the anthem “maybe ... shouldn’t be in the country.”

Heart doctor for former President H.W. Bush killed in bicycle drive-by shooting 

A cardiologist who treated former President George H.W. Bush was shot and killed Friday in a bicycle drive-by shooting near Texas Medical Center in Houston.

>> Read more trending news 

Police said Dr. Mark Hausknecht, 65, was riding his bicycle near Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women just before 9 a.m. on Friday when he was shot by another bicyclist going in the other direction, Houston Police tweeted.

The man fired two shots at Hausknecht before taking off on his bike, police said.

Hausknecht was on his way to work at the time, KTRK reported. A witness flagged down a private ambulance driving by the scene. Emergency crews rushed him to a nearby hospital, where he later died.

Investigators do not know if the shooting was random or targeted, or possibly the result of road rage.

Jim McGrath, spokesperson for former President H.W. Bush, 94, issued a statement on Twitter.

“Mark was a fantastic cardiologist and a good man,” President Bush said in the statement. “I will always be grateful for his exceptional, compassionate care. His family is in our prayers.”

The suspect in the shooting is still at large, CNN reports. He is described as a 30-year-old white or Hispanic man, wearing a tan baseball cap, grey jacket, khaki shorts and riding a light-colored mountain bicycle. 

9 members of one family among 17 killed in duck boat accident on lake in Branson, Missouri 

A duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake in Branson, Missouri, killed 17 people Thursday night, including the boat’s driver and nine members of an Indiana family, according to authorities. Fourteen other people were injured.

>> Read more trending news 

Update 8:45 a.m. EDT July 21: The Stone County coroner confirmed to KSDK that William Asher, 69, and his girlfriend, Rose Hamann, were among those killed in Thursday night's duck boat accident in Missouri.

The news station reported that the couple lived in St. Louis County, Missouri. They were visiting Branson to celebrate Hamann’s birthday, which was on Monday, according KSDK.

Todd Dennison’s mother, 64-year-old Leslie Dennison, was also killed in the boat accident, the Kansas City Star reported. In an emotional and brief interview Friday, Todd Dennison told the newspaper that his mother was visiting Branson with his 12-year-old daughter, Alicia, and that they were together for less than an hour before they boarded the duck boat.

He told the Star that while in the hospital on Thursday night, his daughter told him that she could feel her grandmother pushing her upward from below while the boat was sinking.“She said her grandmother saved her,” Todd Dennison told the Star.

Update 1:30 a.m. EDT July 21: Authorities have identified more victims in the duck boat accident.

Steve Smith and his teenage son, Lance Smith, from Osceola, Arkansas, were among those killed in the crash.

Steve Smith was a pastor and Lance Smith was preparing to open his own church in less than a week, according to CNN, first reported by The Christian Chronicle

Steve Smith’s daughter, Loren Smith, suffered a concussion during the accident but survived.

Smith’s wife, Pam Smith, opted to stay behind and was not on the boat.

William and Janice Bright from Higginsville, Missouri, near Kansas City, were also identified as victims in the crash.

WDAF reports that the couple had three children, 16 grandchildren and had been married for 45 years.

“My great nieces and nephews now have no grandparents,” Karen Abbott, William Bright’s sister, told WDAF.

Update 11:00 p.m. EDT July 20: A summer vacation ended in tragedy for nine members of an Indiana family, along with eight other tourists, killed when a duck boat capsized Thursday evening on a lake in Branson, Missouri.

The Coleman family had traveled to Branson for their annual road trip, according to The New York Times, which interviewed Carolyn Coleman.

Coleman said she lost two of her brothers-in-law and that three generations of the family died in the accident, including four young children, the Times reported.

“We just lost some wonderful people,” she said.

The Indianapolis Star reported that the four children killed in the accident were all under the age of 10.

"They were very loved," Ingrid Coleman Douglas said in a telephone interview with the Star.

Coleman Douglas said the victims included two of her uncles, cousins and their children.

"It’s a huge family on all sides. It’s unimaginable. I would never have thought I would have lost this number of people this way," she said.

Coleman Douglas identified the victims as her uncles Horace "Butch" Coleman and Irving Raymond Coleman; Horace Coleman's wife, Belinda Coleman; her cousins, Angela Coleman and Glenn Coleman; Angela's 2-year-old son Maxwell; Glenn's two sons Evan and Reece; and his 1-year-old daughter, Arya.

Glenn's wife, Tia Coleman, and Angela's older son, whose name has not been released, survived the accident, the Star reported.

Update 5:15 p.m. EDT July 20: Stone County authorities now say all 17 of the victims in the duck boat accident have been accounted for and that nine of the victims were from the same family, according to Gov. Mike Parson’s office. Two members of the family, identified by local news outlets as the Coleman family, survived. Officials said the victims range in age from 1 to 70 years old.

Meantime, mourners are putting flowers on the victims’ cars in the Ride the Ducks parking lot, and the community of Branson, Missouri, is holding several candlelight vigils Friday night in memory of those killed. 

One of the vigils is scheduled at Table Rock Lake where the accident happened, according to KY3-TV.

Update 4:30 p.m. EDT July 20: Family and friends are mourning the staggering loss of life on Table Rock Lake Thursday evening.

One woman lost nine members of her family, USA Today reported, citing Gov. Mike Parson’s office.

Update 2:20 p.m. EDT July 20: Branson Mayor Karen Best told The Associated Press that Bob Williams, the man who was driving the Ride the Ducks boat that sunk Thursday in a southwest Missouri lake, was a “great ambassador for Branson” who “was at every event.”

Seventeen people died, including Williams, and 14 others were injured Thursday when the duck boat capsized in Table Rock Lake, according to authorities.

Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said earlier Friday that the boat’s captain survived.

In a statement posted on Facebook, employees of Ride the Ducks Branson said the business would be closed “while we support the investigation, and to allow time to grieve for the families and the community.”

“This incident has deeply affected all of us. Words cannot convey how profoundly our hearts are breaking,” the statement said. “Thank you for your support, and we ask that your thoughts and prayers be with the families during this time.”

Update 11:40 a.m. EDT July 20: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said Friday morning that authorities recovered four more bodies after a duck boat capsized in southwest Missouri, KSMU reported, bringing the death toll from Thursday’s incident to 17.

Rader said 14 people were taken to hospitals after the incident. He said the driver of the Ride the Ducks boat died. The captain survived.

Update 11:20 a.m. EDT July 20: Nearly two decades ago, the National Transportation Safety Board issued a warning about boats with overhead canopies like the one that sank Thursday on Table Rock Lake after a deadly accident claimed 13 lives in Arkansas, according to the Kansas City Star.

The Miss Majestic duck boat was carrying 21 passengers when it sank in 1999 in Lake Hamilton, the Star reported. Authorities found seven dead passengers trapped inside the boat when they recovered it, four of which were pinned to the underside of the canopy, according to the Star.

“Contributing to the high loss of life was a continuous canopy roof that entrapped passengers within the sinking vehicle,” NTSB officials said in an accident report.

Authorities continued searching Friday for four people who are presumed dead after Thursday’s accident in southwest Missouri. Officials said 13 other people have been confirmed dead in the incident.

Update 10:25 a.m. EDT July 20: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said divers are going back in the water Friday in search of four people who remain missing and are presumed dead after Thursday’s duck boat accident on Table Rock Lake.

Rader said the search had shifted to “recovery mode for the bodies that are still missing,” at a news conference Friday morning.

"It's been a long night,” Rader said. “It's been a very trying night.”

Rader said the driver of the Ride the Ducks boat died but that the captain survived.

Update 10:05 a.m. EDT July 20: Authorities are expected to provide an update on the investigation into Thursday's deadly duck boat accident in Missouri at a news conference Friday.

Update 9:55 a.m. EDT July 20: President Donald Trump shared sympathies Friday to the families and friends of the people involved in Thursday’s deadly duck boat accident in southwest Missouri.

“Such a tragedy, such a great loss,” the president wrote Friday in a tweet. “May God be with you all!”

Update 8:15 a.m. EDT July 20: Officials with the State Highway Patrol said Friday that two more bodies have been found after Thursday’s duck boat accident in southwest Missouri, bringing the death toll to 13.

 >> On AJC.com: Bahamas boating tragedy brings vacation safety to the forefront

State Highway Patrol Sgt. Jason Pace said four other people remained missing.

Original report: Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader said 14 people were taken to hospitals after the incident. Seven were being treated early Friday, he said.

The boat capsized after a strong line of thunderstorms moved through the area around 7 p.m. Thursday. Rader said weather “was a factor” in the incident.

Authorities said the boat had 31 people on board, including children, when it capsized. 

The boat had life jackets on board, according to CNN. The news network reported that other boats on the water docked before the bad weather hit.

The National Transportation Safety Board has sent a team to investigate and are asking anyone who witnessed the accident to come forward.

A dive team and rescue officials worked through the night to find survivors.

They ended the search around 11 p.m., according to KY3.

Emergency responders set up a staging area overnight on the lakeshore near the Showboat Branson Belle, local media reported, although the Belle was not involved in the accident.

Branson officials opened an emergency shelter inside city hall for the victims.

National Weather Service meteorologist Steve Linderberg said a top wind speed of 63 mph was measured around 7 p.m. Thursday at Branson Airport. 

“There’s nothing to slow down winds in an open area,” he said.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is watching the developments.

DUKW, known as duck boats, are six-wheel-drive amphibious vehicles that were used by the U.S. military during World War II and the Korean War. 

Since then, duck boat tours have become popular and are offered on lakes and rivers around the United States, including Missouri, Wisconsin, Massachusetts and Alabama.

Ripley Entertainment acquired the Ride The Ducks in Branson in late 2017 from Ride the Ducks International, a subsidiary of Norcross, Georgia-based Herschend Family Entertainment Corp.

Ride the Ducks International manufactures amphibious vehicles and licenses them for tours at affiliates. It also operates duck tours at Stone Mountain Park in Georgia. The company formerly operated tours in several other cities, including Baltimore, San Francisco and Philadelphia. But in recent years it ended operations following deadly accidents. 

In 2015, a Ride the Ducks tour bus collided with a charter bus carrying student on the Aurora bridge in Seattle.

Five students were killed and several others injured.

The Associated Press and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution contributed to this report.

Deadly duck tour boat crashes date back nearly two decades

As families and friends mourn the deaths of 17 people killed on a tourist duck boat in Branson, Missouri, the National Transportation Safety Board is beginning its investigation into what caused the crash.

>>Related: 9 members of one family among 17 killed in duck boat accident on lake in Branson, Missouri 

The tragedy at Table Rock Lake wasn’t the first time a duck amphibious vehicle had been involved in a deadly crash.

Since 1999, 40 people have been killed in deadly crashes involving amphibious tour buses, according to The Associated Press.

>> Read more trending news 

1999: Arkansas

“Miss Majestic” sank May 1, 1999 near Hot Springs, Arkansas in Lake Hamilton. 

The boat was only seven minutes into its tour when it sunk by the stern and went to the bottom of the lake, according to the Associated Press

Thirteen people were killed.

The boat had to be hoisted out of the lake by a crane.

The NTSB report found that roofs or canopies on the duck boats put passengers in danger, because passengers could become trapped underneath them -- especially if they were wearing life jackets, because of their natural buoyancy.

The cause of the accident was determined to be inadequate maintenance of the vehicle, built by the U.S. Army in 1944.

2003: Boston

Rosemary Hamelburg, 63, fell backward off a duck boat into a parking lot while taking a photo.

She died four days later.

Her family filed a wrongful death lawsuit. Her family and lawyers said the duck boat operation failed to follow its own safety policies on board the Boston Duck Tours Boat.

The company settled with Hamelburg’s estate for $425,000.

2010: Philadelphia 

A collision between a duck boat and a stalled tugboat on the Delaware River in Philadelphia caused the duck boat to sink.

Two students from Hungary were killed and over 25 people hurt, WPVI reports.

The NTSB determined that the tugboat operator was distracted by talking to family members on his cellphone and laptop. 

The duck boat was also found at fault -- investigators found the boat had maintenance issues and faulted the captain for anchoring in an active boat channel.

2015: Philadelphia 

Elizabeth Karnicki, 68, of Beaumont, Texas, was hit and killed as she crossed a busy Philadelphia street at rush hour in May 2015.

Her husband argued duck boats have large blind spots and drivers cannot see pedestrians. 

According to the Kansas City Star, he sued the company but eventually settled.

2015: Seattle

Five college students were killed and 69 others hurt after a duck boat collided with a charter bus on Seattle’s Aurora Bridge in September 2015.

The NTSB determined that an axle on the duck boat broke, causing the driver to lose control and slam into the charter bus, carrying a group of international students.

NTSB investigators determined that Ride the Ducks International, the duck boat parent company, violated law by not telling regulators about a safety defect on the duck boat’s axle and failing to recall the vehicle.

The company agreed to pay all penalties. 

2016: Boston

Allison Warmuth, 28, was hit and killed by a duck boat while riding a motor scooter in downtown Boston in 2016, NBC reports.

NTSB investigators found that the duck boat driver took his eyes off the road to point out landmarks along the tour before the accident.

This prompted the Massachusetts legislature to pass a new law prohibiting drivers from serving as a tour guide and driver.  

The duck boats were also required to add new safety equipment, including blind spot cameras.

The  Associated Press contributed to this article

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