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Ancient coins, bracelets looted from Romania return home

Coins and bracelets from the 1st century that were looted from western Romania years ago and smuggled out of the country were put on display Thursday after a joint investigation with Austria brought them back home.

The treasure trove of gold and silver artifacts, stolen between 2000 and 2001, was presented at Romania's National History Museum. The items were found in Austria in 2015 and returned following a cross-border investigation.

The artifacts_473 coins and 18 bracelets— were taken from archaeological sites in the Orastie Mountains that had been inhabited by Dacians, who fought against the Romans in the early 2nd century.

General Prosecutor Augustin Lazar said 21 people have been convicted in the thefts.

Museum curator Ernest Oberlander-Tarnoveanu said it was "one of the finest recoveries of Dacian treasure in last 200 years" and called their return "a moment of joy, hope and ... pride."

He said the artifacts may have been an offering that a Dacian family made to the gods, which now was valued at "tens of millions of euros (dollars)."

Lazar urged Romanians to be vigilant in guarding their national heritage, and praised a local shepherd who called police after he saw someone entering an archaeological site with a metal detector.

He said intermediaries had taken the artifacts to auction houses and antique shops claiming "they are from my late grandparent's collection."

Women take fall in Nobel scandal for man's alleged misdeeds

Thousands of protesters called Thursday for the resignation of the secretive board that awards the Nobel Prize in Literature after a sex-abuse scandal linked to the prestigious Swedish academy forced the ouster of its first-ever woman head and tarnished the reputation of the coveted prize.

The ugly internal feud has already reached the top levels of public life in the Scandinavian nation known for its promotion of gender equality, with the prime minister, the king and the Nobel board weighing in.

On Thursday evening, thousands of protesters gathered on Stockholm's picturesque Stortorget Square outside the headquarters of the Swedish Academy, which has awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature since 1901, to demand all of its remaining members resign. Parallel demonstrations were planned in Goteborg, Helsingborg, Eskilstuna, Vasteras, and Borgholm.

The national protests have grown out of what began as Sweden's own #MeToo moment in November when the country saw thousands of sexual misconduct allegations surfacing from all walks of life. It hit the academy when 18 women came forward with accusations against Jean-Claude Arnault, a major cultural figure in Sweden who is married to Katarina Frostenson, a poet who is a member of the academy.

Police are investigating the allegations, which Arnault denies, but the case has exposed bitter divisions within the academy, whose members are appointed for life, and given rise to accusations of patriarchal leanings among some members.

The turmoil began when some of the committee's 18 members pushed for the removal of Frostenson after the allegations were levied against her husband, who runs a cultural club that has received money from the academy. In addition to sexual misconduct, Arnault is also accused of leaking Nobel winners' names for years.

After a closed-door vote failed to oust her, three male members behind the push — Klas Ostergren, Kjell Espmark and Peter Englund — themselves resigned. That prompted Horace Engdahl, a committee member who has supported Arnault, to label them a "clique of sore losers" and criticize the three for airing their case in public.

He also lashed out at Sara Danius, the first woman to lead the Swedish Academy, who was forced out last week amid criticism from male members of her handling of the scandal. Danius, a Swedish literature historian at Stockholm University, had cut the academy's ties with Arnault and hired investigators to examine its relationship to the club he ran with Frostenson. Their report is expected soon.

Supporters of Danius have described her as progressive leader who pushed reforms that riled the old guard.

At Thursday's protests, many participants wore pussy-bow blouses like the ones worn by Danius. The high-necked blouses with a loosely tied bow at the neck have become a rallying symbol for those critical of the Swedish Academy's handling of the case.

Birgitta Hojlund, 70, who traveled several hours to attend the protest, said despite Sweden's progressive image, women still face inequality. "There are still differences, in wages and in honors and in professions," she said, calling for the Swedish academy to be "recreated from the bottom, and balance male and female."

"They're pushing women away, saying that sexism is OK, in this academy," agreed Torun Carrfors, a 31-year-old nurse. "They should leave, and we need to have new ones."

Last week, Frostenson announced she too was leaving the academy. On Thursday, a sixth member, writer Lotta Lotass, said she, was also planning to step down, citing backlash from tradition-minded male members of the board who questioned her credentials, the Dagens Nyheter newspaper reported.

The departures of the highly respected women have given rise to a flurry of protests on social media.

"Feminist battles happen every day," wrote Swedish Culture Minister Alice Bah Kuhnke, who posted a picture of herself last week wearing a white pussy-bow blouse like those worn by Danius. Other Swedish women also posted pictures of themselves in the blouses as anger grew over Danius' departure, including Social Affairs Minister Annika Strandhall, actress Helena Bergstrom and fashion designer Camilla Thulin.

The public controversy has also given rise to concerns about the Swedish Academy losing its credibility and tarnishing the reputation of the Nobel Prize.

"The Swedish Academy is an internationally acclaimed organization and it should stand for all the right values and at the present moment I don't think they do," said Carsten Greiff, a 32-year-old business developer, attending Thursday's protest. "It's dragging the international view of the Nobel Prize in the dirt."

King Carl XVI Gustaf said the resignations "risked seriously damaging" the academy, while Prime Minister Stefan Lofven emphasized the academy's importance to Sweden and urged its members to "restore faith and respect."

"Trust in the Swedish Academy has been seriously damaged," the Nobel Foundation said of the situation, while demanding the group take action to restore that trust.

Despite the resignations the academy, founded by King Gustav III in 1786, does not currently have a mechanism for its lifetime-appointed board members to step down.

The king — the academy's patron, who must approve its secret votes— said Wednesday in the wake of the recent events he wants to change rules to allow resignations.

"The number of members who do not actively participate in the academy's work is now so large that it is seriously risking the academy's ability to fulfill its important tasks," he said.

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Olsen reported from Copenhagen, Denmark. Associated Press writer David Rising in Berlin contributed to this report.

'Dance Moms' star Abby Lee Miller diagnosed with cancer, doctors say

Former “Dance Moms” reality TV star and Pittsburgh native Abby Lee Miller has been diagnosed with cancer.

People Magazine is reporting Miller has been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma a day after undergoing emergency spinal surgery.

>> Read more trending news 

Doctor’s originally thought she had a severe infection. Miller is not out of the woods from the surgery yet and doctors said she plans to start chemotherapy and radiation soon.

Miller was recently transferred from federal prison to a reentry center in March.

She had been serving her sentence at a medium security prison in Victorville, California.

Miller was sentenced a year and a day in prison for bankruptcy fraud.

Investigators said Miller brought nearly $120,000 in Australian currency into the United States and not reporting it.

Howard commencement to feature "Black Panther" Boseman

The "Black Panther" is returning to his alma mater to give the commencement address at Howard University.

The university announced Wednesday that Chadwick Boseman will give the keynote address at Howard's 150th commencement ceremony on May 12.

News outlets report Boseman will be presented with an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, the university's highest honor.

Howard University President Wayne Frederick said his role in the blockbuster "Black Panther" film "reminds us of the excellence found in the African diaspora and how Howard continues to be a gem that produces the next generation of artist-scholars, humanitarians, scientists, engineers and doctors."

The South Carolina native also starred in movies portraying Jackie Robinson, James Brown and fellow Howard graduate Thurgood Marshall.

'I Feel Pretty' star Amy Schumer recalls losing her confidence as 10-year-old

The guy really got into Amy Schumer’s head. Here she was full of confidence and spunk, and he had to make a deflating remark.

>> Read more trending news

“I was 10 years old, which is kind of late. That’s kind of lucky, to hang onto your confidence until you’re 10,” she said during a recent interview to discuss “I Feel Pretty,” which opens in theaters Friday. “It was a guy I was friends with. He said, ‘You have a big butt.’ I was like, ‘I do?’ It didn’t occur to me that people had different bodies. That’s a learned thing. I remember him saying that to me and me accepting it as fact.”

In “I Feel Pretty,” Schumer plays Renee Bennett, a young woman struggling with self-esteem, an empty dance card and a job going nowhere. When she’s magically transformed into a gorgeous knockout, she suddenly commands every room with confidence, finds a great boyfriend and sees her career take off.

Here’s the catch, though. Renee actually looks the same to everyone else; a conk on the head has left only her seeing herself differently. And her supposed outer beauty summons some inner ugliness.

During the interview with Schumer, she talked about relating to her character and the serious message the comedy imparts.

Q: How do you relate to Renee?

A: I’ve been there. I’m not done being there. I’ve had long periods of time, especially in college, where I didn’t understand at all where my worth came from and it seemed like it was all about being attractive. I was lucky that I realized quickly that’s not what it’s about at all. I still have those days. When I was playing her (having) really low self-esteem, that was tough, being that vulnerable. The confident stuff was really kind of fun, and good for me.

Q: One lively scene in “I Feel Pretty” involves Renee’s impromptu performance at a bikini beauty pageant, where she owns the stage and the crowd. How many takes did that involve?

A: I definitely did that dance 10 times. It’s my fault. I was supposed to just stand there and pose in a bikini and I was like, “No, this is a really empowering moment. I want a choreographer.” I think we pulled it off.

Q: What’s your message for people constantly checking their appearances to ensure they look perfect?

A: You just want to fast-forward them to their late 30s. I feel the best when I’m just hanging out with my family and friends, just laughing.

Q: Early in “I Feel Pretty,” Renee drops a coin into a fountain and wishes for beauty. If there was a magic fountain you could make a wish in, and change something about your personality or add a skill, superpower or some ability, what sort of non physical gift would you wish for?

A: Patience. I have a low threshold. I’m really efficient. I don’t even like when you call the bank and they go, “Hi, thank you for calling” and the whole run-through. I just start saying my number. To work in this business and do the jobs that I’ve been doing, you really have to be selective with your energy.

Q: Who do you look to for guidance and inspiration?

A: My sister and also people I see on the street. When I see people on the street, they say, “Keep going.” Maybe they mean I should keep walking. I’m not looking to please everyone. I wouldn’t be so outspoken about how I feel about things if I was. If I’m making a difference and these people want to encourage me to keep going, that really means a lot to me.

Q: The movie’s cast includes legendary supermodels Naomi Campbell and Lauren Hutton, who became famous when there was more distance between celebrities and the public. Talk about the difference in how things are now.

A: It’s as if you’re a politician. People want to know your feelings about everything, and it has to be the whole package. They look to burn you if you get to a certain level in the public eye. It’s like everybody wants people to get burned at the stake and taken down. It’s so out of your hands it doesn’t feel like something you can try and curate or control. That’s kind of freeing.

Q: Given how busy you are, how do you carve out time for yourself to recharge?

A: Long walks with my dog. Sex. And boxing. Boxing’s so good. You just feel so chill the rest of the day. And acupuncture. Just being physically well.

Far-right cancels bid to shut Berlin's Berghain techno club

A far-right party has withdrawn its proposal to close down one of Berlin's most famous techno clubs after the plan drew widespread ridicule in the laissez-faire German capital.

Sibylle Schmidt, a district councilor for the Alternative for Germany party, had demanded that the Berghain club lose its license to operate over partygoers' drug consumption and lascivious behavior on the dance floor.

Schmidt also complained about the club's "unintelligent, ugly" bouncers and demanded "better lighting and staff to prevent sexual acts."

Berghain's weekend-long raves are particularly popular with foreign tourists.

Using the hashtag #berghain, Twitter users made fun of the proposal and compared Schmidt's agenda to that of "hardcore Islamists."

The German news agency dpa reported Thursday that Schmidt's party has distanced itself from her proposal.

Dubai film festival to become biennial, skipping this year

The Dubai International Film Festival says it will skip holding the event this year, instead becoming biennial and reconvening in 2019.

The film festival made the announcement late on Wednesday night, saying the decision came in part over "the vast changes taking place both in the regional and global movie-making and content industry."

The film festival began in 2004 and has hosted stars from Hollywood, Bollywood and Arabic films.

In recent years, however, the festival has lost some its luster.

The National, a state-linked English-language newspaper in Abu Dhabi, reported on Thursday that "several key staff have already been relieved of their positions" at the film festival.

The newspaper also noted that Dubai's one-time Gulf Film Festival similarly announced a biennial strategy in 2014, "never to be heard of again."

First Saudi cinema opens with popcorn and 'Black Panther'

The lights dimmed and the crowd of men and women erupted into applause and hoots as Hollywood's blockbuster "Black Panther" premiered in Saudi Arabia's first movie theater.

Though it was a private, invitation-only screening on Wednesday evening, for many Saudis it marked one of the clearest moments of change to sweep the country in decades.

It's seen as part of a new era in which women will soon be allowed to drive and people in the kingdom will be able to go to concerts and fashion shows, and tuck into a bucket of popcorn in a cinema.

"It's a new era, a new age. It's that simple. Things are changing, progress is happening. We're opening up and we're catching up with everything that's happening in the world," said Rahaf Alhendi, who attended the showing.

Authorities said the public would be able to purchase tickets online on Thursday for showings starting Friday. But there may be delays.

Movies screened in Saudi cinemas will be subject to approval by government censors, and Wednesday night's premiere was no exception. Scenes of violence were not cut, but a final scene involving a kiss was axed.

Still, it's a stark reversal for a country where public movie screenings were banned in the 1980s during a wave of ultraconservatism that swept Saudi Arabia. Many Saudi clerics view Western movies and even Arabic films made in Egypt and Lebanon as sinful.

Despite decades of ultraconservative dogma, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has pushed through a number of major social reforms with support from his father, King Salman, to satiate the desires of the country's majority young population.

"This is a historic day for your country," Adam Aron, CEO of AMC Entertainment, told the crowd at the screening. "It's been about 37 years since you've been able to watch movies the way movies are meant to be watched in a theater, together on a big screen."

U.S.-based AMC, one of the world's biggest movie theater operators, only two weeks earlier signed a deal with Prince Mohammed to operate the first cinema in the kingdom. AMC and its local partner hurriedly transformed a concert hall in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, into a cinema complex for Wednesday's screening.

Aron said the company plans to rip out the current concert-style seats and replace them with plush leather recliners and build three more screens in the complex to accommodate up to 5,000 movie-goers a day.

Samer Alsourani traveled from Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province for the event. He commended the crown prince for following through on his promises to modernize the country.

"This is the first time that we really see something that's really being materialized," he said.

The social reforms undertaken by the 32-year-old heir to the throne are part of his so-called Vision 2030, a blueprint for Saudi Arabia that aims to boost local spending and create jobs amid sustained lower oil prices.

The Saudi government projects that the opening of movie theaters will contribute more than 90 billion riyals ($24 billion) to the economy and create more than 30,000 jobs by 2030. The kingdom says there will be 300 cinemas with around 2,000 screens built by 2030.

AMC has partnered with a subsidiary of Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund, known as the Public Investment Fund, to build up to 40 AMC cinemas across the country over the next five years.

Saudi Arabia had already started gradually loosening restrictions on movie screenings in the past few years, with local film festivals and screenings in makeshift theaters. For the most part, though, until now Saudis who wanted to watch a film in a movie theater had to drive to nearby Bahrain or the United Arab Emirates for weekend trips to the cinema.

In the 1970s, there were informal movie screenings but the experience could be interrupted by the country's religious police, whose powers have since been curbed.

Jamal Khashoggi, a dissident Saudi writer, describes the theaters of the 1970s as being "like American drive-ins, except much more informal." In an opinion piece for The Washington Post, he wrote that a friend once broke his leg at a screening in Medina when he jumped off a wall to escape the religious police and avoid arrest.

By the 1980s, movie screenings were largely banned unless they took place in private residential compounds for foreigners or at cultural centers run by foreign embassies.

Access to streaming services, such as Netflix, and satellite TV steadily eroded attempts by the government to censor what the Saudi public could view. By 2013, the film "Wadjda" made history by becoming the first Academy Award entry for Saudi Arabia, though it wasn't nominated for the Oscars.

To adhere to the kingdom's norms on gender segregation, certain screenings may be held for families and others for male-only crowds. But, generally movie theaters will not be gender segregated with "family sections" for women and related men and separate "single sections" for male-only crowds as is customary at restaurants and cafes.

Saudi Minister of Culture and Information Awwad Alawwad told The Associated Press the government aims to strike a balance between the country's Islamic mores and people's movie experiences.

"We want to ensure the movies are in line with our culture and respect for values. Meanwhile, we want to provide people with a beautiful show and really enjoy watching their own movies," he said.

The new movie theater also came equipped with prayer rooms to accommodate the daily Muslim prayer times.

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Associated Press writer Malak Harb in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, contributed to this report.

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Aya Batrawy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ayaelb .

At trial, experts debate drug Cosby gave to his accuser

It's long been one of the most enduring mysteries of Bill Cosby's sexual assault case: What drug did he give his chief accuser on the night she says he molested her?

Cosby has insisted he handed 1 ½ tablets of the over-the-counter cold and allergy medicine Benadryl to Andrea Constand to help her relax before their sexual encounter at his home outside Philadelphia more than a dozen years ago. Constand testified he gave her three small blue pills that left her incapacitated and unable to resist as he molested her.

A pair of drug experts — one for the prosecution, one for the defense — testified at the TV star's retrial Thursday that paralysis isn't known to be a side effect of Benadryl, though its active ingredient can cause drowsiness and muscle weakness, among other side effects.

And Cosby's expert, Harry Milman, said he doesn't know of any small blue pill that could have produced the symptoms that Constand described.

The "Cosby Show" star has previously acknowledged under oath he gave quaaludes — a powerful sedative and 1970s-era party drug that's been banned in the U.S. for more than 35 years — to women he wanted to have sex with, but denied having them by the time he met Constand in the early 2000s.

Dr. Timothy Rohrig, a forensic toxicologist called by prosecutors, testified Thursday that quaaludes can make people sleepy. But he and Milman said the drug came in large white pills — not small and blue.

Prosecutors rested their case after Rohrig got off the witness stand. The defense immediately asked Judge Steven O'Neill to acquit Cosby and send jurors home, arguing prosecutors hadn't proved aggravated indecent assault charges. O'Neill refused.

The defense also contended there's no evidence to prove the alleged assault happened within the 12-year statute of limitations. Prosecutors countered that Constand and Cosby have both said the encounter was in 2004. Cosby was arrested in late 2015, just before the deadline to charge him.

As the legal wrangling continued, Thursday's testimony focused on the drug taken by Constand, who has testified she thought they were an herbal supplement meant to relieve her stress.

Constand said Cosby called the pills "your friends" and told her they would "help take the edge off."

She testified earlier this week that Cosby refused to tell her what they were when she confronted him about two months later. Her mother testified that Cosby told her in a January 2005 phone conversation that he'd have to look at a prescription bottle and would send the answer to her by mail.

She said he never did.

Cosby said in a subsequent police interview that he gave her Benadryl, then fondled her breasts and genitals. He said Constand never told him to stop.

Cosby, in a 2005 deposition read to jurors by a police detective, said he obtained seven prescriptions for quaaludes from his doctor in Los Angeles in the 1970s, ostensibly for a sore back, but added he did not use them himself because they made him tired.

He said he gave quaaludes to women he wanted to have sex with, using them "the same as a person would say, 'Have a drink.'"

Rohrig, the director of a regional forensic science center and medical examiner's office in Wichita, Kansas, called quaaludes "an old-timey sedative, hypnotic drug" that at one time were believed to be an aphrodisiac.

Quaaludes have been illegal in the U.S. since 1982. They're still legal in Canada and parts of Europe, Rohrig said.

The Cosby camp dismissed the quaaludes talk.

"Quaaludes were not blue," the comedian's spokeswoman, Ebonee Benson, shouted to reporters after the experts' testimony. "Today should be the last day the discussion of quaaludes is had regarding these accusations against Mr. Cosby."

Benson said prosecutors want jurors to accept "a fabricated story about three small, blue pills" and believe that they're "somehow quaaludes."

The expert testimony came on the ninth day of Cosby's retrial on sexual assault charges that could send the star to prison for years.

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

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Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak.

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For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial.

Files show rising alarm in Prince's circle as health failed

Some of Prince's closest confidants had grown increasingly alarmed about his health in the days before he died and tried to get him help as they realized he had an opioid addiction — yet none were able to give investigators the insight they needed to determine where the musician got the fentanyl that killed him, according to investigative documents released Thursday.

Just ahead of this weekend's two-year anniversary of Prince's death, prosecutors announced they would file no criminal charges in the case and the state investigation was closed.

"My focus was lasered in on trying to find out who provided that fentanyl, and we just don't know where he got it," said Carver County Attorney Mark Metz. "We may never know. ... It's pretty clear from the evidence that he did not know, and the people around him didn't know, that he was taking fentanyl."

Metz said Prince had suffered from pain for years and likely believed he was taking a common painkiller.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park studio compound on April 21, 2016. His death sparked a national outpouring of grief and prompted a joint investigation by Carver County and federal authorities.

An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin.

The investigative materials — including documents , photos and videos — were posted online Thursday afternoon. Several images show the music superstar's body on the floor of his Paisley Park estate, near an elevator. He is on his back, his head on the floor, eyes closed. His right hand is on his stomach and left arm on the floor.

The documents include interviews with Prince's inner circle. That included longtime friend and bodyguard Kirk Johnson, who told investigators that he had noticed Prince "looking just a little frail," but said he did not realize he had an opioid addiction until he passed out on a plane a week before he died.

"It started to all making sense though, just his behavior sometimes and change of mood and I'm like oh this is what, I think this is what's going on, that's why I took the initiative and said let's go to my doctor because you haven't been to the doctor, let's check it all out," Johnson said, according to a transcript of an interview with investigators.

Johnson said after that episode, Prince canceled some concerts as friends urged him to rest. Johnson also said that Prince "said he wanted to talk to somebody" about his addiction.

Johnson asked his own doctor, Michael Todd Schulenberg, to see Prince on April 7, 2016. Schulenberg told authorities he gave Prince an IV; authorities said he also prescribed Vitamin D and a nausea medication — under Johnson's name. Johnson then called Schulenberg on April 14, asking the doctor to prescribe a pain medication for Prince's hip. Schulenberg did so, again under Johnson's name, Metz said.

On the night of April 14 to April 15, Prince passed out on a flight home from Atlanta, and the private plane made an emergency stop in Moline, Illinois. The musician had to be revived with two doses of a drug that reverses effects of an opioid overdose.

A paramedic told a police detective that after the second shot of naloxone, Prince "took a large gasp and woke up," according to the investigative documents. He said Prince told paramedics, "I feel all fuzzy."

A nurse at the hospital where Prince was taken for monitoring told detectives that he refused routine overdose testing that would have included blood and urine tests. When asked what he had taken, he didn't say what it was, but that "someone gave it to him to relax." Other documents say Prince said he took one or two pills.

The documents show that Johnson contacted Schulenberg again on April 18, and expressed concern that Prince was struggling with opioids. At that time, Schulenberg told investigators, Johnson apologized for asking the doctor to prescribe the previous painkiller.

An assistant to Prince told investigators that he had been unusually quiet and sick with the flu in the days before he was found dead. Meron Bekure said she last saw Prince a day earlier, when she was going to take him to the doctor for a checkup but that Prince told her he would go with Johnson instead.

On that day, Schulenberg saw Prince and ran some tests and prescribed other medications to help him. A urinalysis came back positive for opioids. That same day, Paisley Park staffers contacted California addiction specialist Dr. Howard Kornfeld. The doctor sent his son, Andrew, to Minnesota that night, and the younger Kornfeld was among those who found Prince's body. Andrew Kornfeld was carrying buprenorphine, a medication that can be used to help treat opioid addiction.

Andrew Kornfeld told investigators that Prince was still warm to the touch when he was found, but that rigor mortis had begun to set in.

The documents also show that Prince's closest confidants knew he was a private person and tried to respect that, with Johnson saying: "That's what pisses me off cause it's like man, how did he hide this so well?"

Metz said some of Prince's friends might have enabled him as they tried to protect him.

"There is no doubt that the actions of individuals will be criticized, questioned and judged in the days and weeks to come," Metz said. "But suspicions and innuendo are categorically insufficient to support any criminal charges."

The U.S. attorney's office also said Thursday it had no credible evidence that would lead to federal criminal charges. A law enforcement official close to the investigation told The Associated Press that the federal investigation is now inactive unless new information emerges. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the federal case remains open.

But federal authorities announced that Schulenberg had agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a civil violation from the allegation that he illegally prescribed the opioid oxycodone for Prince in Johnson's name. Schulenberg admitted to no facts or liability in the settlement, which includes stricter monitoring of his prescribing practices, and authorities said he is not the target of a criminal investigation.

Oxycodone, the generic name for the active ingredient in OxyContin, was not listed as a cause of Prince's death. But it is part of a family of painkillers driving the nation's addiction and overdose epidemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 2 million Americans abused or were addicted to prescription opioids, including oxycodone, in 2014.

A confidential toxicology report obtained by the AP in March showed high concentrations of fentanyl in the singer's blood, liver and stomach. The concentration of fentanyl in Prince's blood alone was 67.8 micrograms per liter, which outside experts called "exceedingly high."

Prince did not have a prescription for fentanyl.

Metz said several pills were found at the Paisley Park complex after Prince died, and some were later determined to be counterfeit.

The underground market for counterfeit prescription pain pills is brisk and can be highly anonymous, said Carol Falkowski, CEO of Drug Abuse Dialogues, a Minnesota-based drug abuse training and consulting organization. Buyers often don't know who they're dealing with or what's in the drugs they purchase, she said.

The likelihood of people buying pain pills on the street or online that turn out to be counterfeits laced with fentanyl is "extremely high," said Traci Green, a Boston University Medical Center epidemiologist who focuses on the opioid epidemic.

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Associated Press writers Steve Karnowski and Doug Glass in Minneapolis, Ryan J. Foley in Des Moines, Iowa, and Tammy Webber in Chicago contributed this report.

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Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com . More of her work at: https://apnews.com/search/amy%20forliti .

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