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Filmmaker Luc Besson targeted in Paris rape complaint

French authorities said Saturday they are investigating a rape accusation against "Valerian" filmmaker Luc Besson, who denies wrongdoing.

A judicial official told The Associated Press that a 27-year-old woman filed a complaint Friday accusing the 59-year-old director of drugging and penetrating her at the hotel Bristol in Paris.

The official was not authorized to be publicly named.

BFM television and Europe-1 radio cite Besson's lawyer as saying he denies the accusations. His attorneys did not return messages from the AP.

The reports came as the Cannes Film Festival is wrapping up; accusations of sexual misconduct and inequality in the movie industry have been prominent themes at the festival this year.

Besson has produced nearly 100 films and written and directed many of them. His films include the "Taken" series, "The Fifth Element" and "Leon." His Europa Corp. production company didn't respond to requests for comment.

Reggie Lucas, who worked with Miles Davis and Madonna, dies

Reggie Lucas, the Grammy-winning musician who played with Miles Davis in the 1970s and produced the bulk of Madonna's debut album, has died. He was 65.

The performer's daughter, Lisa Lucas, told The Associated Press that her father died from complications with his heart early Saturday in New York City.

"After a long and arduous struggle with his physical heart (his emotional one was perfect) he was called home. I wish he'd had more time, I wish we'd all had more time with him, but he left this world absolutely covered in love, with his hands held and his family beside him. I'm glad he's at peace now," Lisa Lucas wrote on her Facebook page.

Lucas was born on Feb. 25, 1953 in the Queens borough of New York City. After playing with Davis in the 70s, Lucas began a musical partnership with percussionist James Mtume. Together they wrote hits like Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway's "The Closer I Get to You" — later covered by Beyonce and Luther Vandross — and Stephanie Mills' "Never Knew Love Like This Before," which won the duo the Grammy for best R&B song.

Lucas went on to produce the majority of Madonna's 1983 self-titled debut album, which sold more than 5 million units and included the hits "Borderline" and "Lucky Star."

In addition to his daughter, Lucas is survived by his wife Leslie Lucas; his son Julian Lucas; his mother Annie Wolinsky; and his brother Greg Lucas.

Oprah to Idris: Celebrities spice up royal wedding

Oprah Winfrey seemed a tad confused about her seating assignment. Serena Williams documented her journey to St. George's Chapel on Instagram. Idris Elba smiled broadly as he escorted his fiancee, model Sabrina Dhowre, who wore the obligatory hat.

They were among a slew of celebrities among the 600 guests Prince Harry and Meghan Markle invited to their wedding ceremony on Saturday, an event from which politicians were excluded.

Several of Markle's former co-stars on the USA Network paralegal drama "Suits" were invited. Among them were Gina Torres, Sarah Rafferty, Abigail Spencer, Rick Hoffman and Markle's on-screen hubby, Patrick J. Adams. "Pretty Little Liars" star Troian Bellisario, Adams' wife, was his plus-one.

Indian actress Priyanka Chopra, a friend of the bride's, strutted into the chapel in a light heather grey Vivienne Westwood pencil skirt and matching jacket with an asymmetric collar.

Tennis star Williams, accompanied by her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, chose a blush, long-sleeve silk drape dress by Atelier Versace to go with her fascinator in pale pink, a hue also favored by Winfrey and others for the royal wedding.

Elton John, looking dapper in tails, did double-duty as a wedding guest and a performer at the luncheon reception hosted by Queen Elizabeth II. He sported pink eyeglasses as he arrived with husband David Furnish.

John was a close friend of the groom's late mother, Princess Diana, and played his hit "Candle in the Wind" at her 1997 funeral. Kensington Palace did not disclose which songs he chose for the wedding.

George and Amal Clooney, James Corden and David and Victoria Beckham also watched the nuptials on the grounds of Windsor Castle — Ms. Clooney in a bright yellow Stella McCartney dress and matching hat. It seemed her hubby walked just slowly enough to keep her out of peril in her heels on the castle's menacing cobblestones.

British singer James Blunt was in traditional tails, while Argentine polo player Nacho Figueras went for a double-breasted blue suit. He didn't forget the pocket square.

Actress Carey Mulligan shined in an all-over yellow floral print dress with a high neck and short sleeves from Erden. She was accompanied by husband Marcus Mumford of the Mumford & Sons band.

Joss Stone was also on hand, prompting BBC commenters to note that the singer, often barefoot on stage, wore shoes.

Oprah's longtime partner, Stedman Graham, said he could have joined her, but was happier giving a commencement address inside a gymnasium in Baltimore, where his advice to graduates just might extend to a certain American across the pond: Don't be concerned with how others define you, he said: "The only thing that matters is how you define yourselves."

The Latest: 'Shoplifters' wins Palme d'Or at Cannes

The Latest on the awards ceremony for the 71st Cannes Film Festival being presented Saturday night (all times local):

8:10 p.m.

Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda's "Shoplifters" is the winner of the Palme d'Or award at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film is a tender portrait of a poor, impoverished family.

The director accepted the award in Japanese and dedicated it to the whole production team involved in movie.

Nadine Labaki's "Capernaum" won the festival's Jury Prize. Spike Lee won the Grand Prize for his film "BlacKkKlansman."

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This item corrects the spelling of director Hirokazu Kore-ada's first name and punctuation on Lee's film "BlacKkKlansman."

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7:55 p.m.

"Cold War" has won the best director award at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film is Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski's follow-up to his 2013 Oscar-winner "Ida."

It is set during the 1940s and 1950s of Poland's communist rule and tells the story about an ill-fated romance between Wiktor (Tomasz Kot), a composer and pianist, and Zula (Joanna Kulig), a singer. They meet at a newly formed academy dedicated to preserving Polish folk music traditions. They flee the country after nationalistic pressures descend on the school.

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7:50 p.m.

Two films have been awarded the best screenplay award at the Cannes Film Festival — "Happy as Lazzaro" and "3 Faces."

Alice Rohrwacher won for "Happy as Lazzaro," her time-warped fable about a poor farm boy in rural Italy.

Nader Saeivar and Jafar Panahi won for "3 Faces." Panahi was unable to leave his native Iran despite pleas from many to allow him to attend Cannes. Among Panahi's vocal supporters is countryman Asghar Farhadi.

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7:15 p.m.

Cannes jury president Cate Blanchett has arrived at the Cannes awards ceremony in a silk gown with a large red bow on the back.

She told journalists Saturday evening that it had been "a very rich and powerful festival" and the deliberations in the jury had been "amicable."

Blanchett says jurors didn't "judge" the winner but they "chose" it.

The actress is one of the few women to head the jury in the festival's 71 year history. She has been a vocal supporter of the #MeToo movement and used the role as a platform to highlight sexism in the film industry. Other jury members arrived shortly after, including actresses Kristen Stewart and Lea Seydoux.

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7 p.m.

Lebanese director Nadine Labaki is among the first contenders for the Cannes Film Festival's Palme d'Or to hit the red carpet at the Palais des Festivals in a fitted one shoulders gown.

Labaki is considered one of the front runners for the film festival's top prize as her film "Capernaum" received the longest standing ovation of the competition, at 15 minutes.

 Spike Lee also was seen on Saturday night's red carpet, telling journalists that he'd been in New York "yesterday." Lee, a Cannes veteran, said he first came to the festival in 1986. His film "BlackKklansman" debuted at the festival and is due to be released in August.

Organizers often call winning contenders for them to come back and attend the ceremony, leading some to speculate on the potential winners based on who graces the red carpet at the end of the 12 day festival.

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5 p.m.

The makers of 21 movies are vying to win the Palme d'Or, the Cannes Film Festival's top prize.

The star-studded awards ceremony is taking place Saturday night in the French Riviera city.

Australian actress and campaigner against sexual harassment Cate Blanchett led this year's jury, which also included actress Kristen Stewart.

The May 8-19 festival, the first since the downfall of film mogul Harvey Weinstein over accusations of sexual misconduct by dozens of women, was dominated by the #MeToo movement.

A movie by one of three female directors in the lineup, "Capernaum" by Lebanon's Nadine Labaki, is considered by some a front-runner for the Palme d'Or.

Other favorites include "BlacKkKlansman" by Spike Lee, "Burning" by South Korea's Lee Chang-dong and "The Wild Pear Tree" by Turkey's Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

Love and fire: Text of Michael Curry's royal wedding address

And now in the name of our loving, liberating and life-giving God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.

From the Song of Solomon, in the Bible:

"Set me as a seal upon your heart,

as a seal upon your arm;

for love is strong as death,

passion fierce as the grave.

Its flashes are flashes of fire,

a raging flame.

Many waters cannot quench love,

neither can floods drown it."

The late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr once said, and I quote: "We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we discover that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world, for love is the only way."

There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power - power in love. If you don't believe me, think about a time when you first fell in love. The whole world seemed to center around you and your beloved.

Oh there's power - power in love. Not just in its romantic forms, but any form, any shape of love. There's a certain sense in which when you are loved, and you know it, when someone cares for you, and you know it, when you love and you show it - it actually feels right. There's something right about it.

And there's a reason for it. The reason has to do with the source. We were made by a power of love, and our lives were meant - and are meant - to be lived in that love. That's why we are here.

Ultimately, the source of love is God himself: the source of all of our lives.

There's an old medieval poem that says: "Where true love is found, God himself is there".

The New Testament says it this way: "Beloved, let us love one another, because love is of God, and those who love are born of God and know God. Those who do not love do not know God. Why? For God is love."

There's power in love. There's power in love to help and heal when nothing else can.

There's power in love to lift up and liberate when nothing else will. There's power in love to show us the way to live.

"Set me as a seal on your heart, a seal on your arm, for love is as strong as death."

But love is not only about a young couple. Now the power of love is demonstrated by the fact that we're all here. Two young people fell in love, and we all showed up. But it's not just for and about a young couple, who we rejoice with. It's more than that.

Jesus of Nazareth on one occasion was asked by a lawyer to sum up the essence of the teachings of Moses, and he went back and he reached back into the Hebrew scriptures, to Deuteronomy and Leviticus, and Jesus said: "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind and all your strength. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like it: Love your neighbor as yourself."

And then in Matthew's version, he added, he said: "On these two, love of God and love of neighbor, hang all the law, all the prophets, everything that Moses wrote, everything in the holy prophets, everything in the scriptures, everything that God has been trying to tell the world — love God, love your neighbors, and while you're at it, love yourself."

Now, someone once said that Jesus began the most revolutionary movement in all of human history. A movement grounded in the unconditional love of God for the world and a movement mandating people to live that love. And in so doing to change not only their lives but the very life of the world itself.

I'm talking about some power. Real power. Power to change the world. If you don't believe me, well, there were some old slaves in America's Antebellum South who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way. They sang a spiritual, even in the midst of their captivity. It's one that says "There's a balm in Gilead..." a healing balm, something that can make things right.

"There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole.

"There is a balm in Gilead

"To heal the sin sick soul."

And one of the stanzas actually explains why. They said:

"If you cannot preach like Peter,

And you cannot pray like Paul,

You just tell the love of Jesus,

How he died to save us all."

Oh, that's the balm in Gilead! This way of love, it is the way of life. They got it. He died to save us all. He didn't die for anything he could get out of it. Jesus did not get an honorary doctorate for dying. He wasn't getting anything out of it. He gave up his life, he sacrificed his life, for the good of others, for the good of the other, for the wellbeing of the world, for us.

That's what love is. Love is not selfish and self-centered. Love can be sacrificial, and in so doing, becomes redemptive. And that way of unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive love changes lives, and it can change this world.

If you don't believe me, just stop and imagine. Think and imagine a world where love is the way.

Imagine our homes and families where love is the way.

Imagine our neighborhoods and communities where love is the way.

Imagine our governments and nations where love is the way.

Imagine business and commerce where this love is the way.

Imagine this tired old world where love is the way.

When love is the way - unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive.

When love is the way, then no child will go to bed hungry in this world ever again.

When love is the way, we will let justice roll down like a mighty stream and righteousness like an ever-flowing brook.

When love is the way, poverty will become history.

When love is the way, the earth will be a sanctuary.

When love is the way, we will lay down our swords and shields, down by the riverside, to study war no more.

When love is the way, there's plenty good room - plenty good room - for all of God's children. Because when love is the way, we actually treat each other, well... like we are actually family.

When love is the way, we know that God is the source of us all, and we are brothers and sisters, children of God.

My brothers and sisters, that's a new heaven, a new earth, a new world, a new human family.

And let me tell you something, old Solomon was right in the Old Testament: that's fire.

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin - and with this I will sit down, we gotta get y'all married - French Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was arguably one of the great minds, great spirits of the 20th century. Jesuit, Roman Catholic priest, scientist, a scholar, a mystic.

In some of his writings, he said, from his scientific background as well as his theological one, in some of his writings he said - as others have - that the discovery, or invention, or harnessing of fire was one of the great scientific and technological discoveries in all of human history.

Fire to a great extent made human civilization possible. Fire made it possible to cook food and to provide sanitary ways of eating, which reduced the spread of disease in its time.

Fire made it possible to heat warm environments and thereby made human migration around the world a possibility, even into colder climates.

Fire made it possible... there was no Bronze Age without fire, no Iron Age without fire, no Industrial Revolution without fire. The advances of fire and technology are greatly dependent on the human ability and capacity to take fire and use it for human good.

Anybody get here in a car today? An automobile? Nod your heads if you did - I know there were some carriages. But those of us who came in cars, fire - controlled, harnessed fire - made that possible.

I know that the Bible says, and I believe it, that Jesus walked on the water. But I have to tell you, I did not walk across the Atlantic Ocean to get here.

Controlled fire in that plane got me here. Fire makes it possible for us to text and tweet and email and Instagram and Facebook and socially be dysfunctional with each other.

Fire made all of that possible, and de Chardin said fire was one of the greatest discoveries in all of human history. And he then went on to say that if humanity ever harnesses the energy of fire again, if humanity ever captures the energy of love - it will be the second time in the history of the world that we have discovered fire.

Dr. King was right: we must discover love - the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world, a new world.

My brother, my sister, God love you, God bless you, and may God hold us all in those almighty hands of love.

Read: Episcopal Church’s Michael Curry’s address at royal wedding

The Most Rev. Michael Curry of the Episcopal Church gave the formal address at the royal wedding between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

Related>>Royal Wedding: Meghan Markle, Prince Harry wed (live updates)

His stirring speech included quotes from civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., American slaves and a Jesuit theologian.

>> Read more trending news

Read the full address, transcribed by The Washington Post:

“The late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said and I quote: “We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we discover that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world. Love is the only way.”

There’s power in love. Do not underestimate it. Don’t even over sentimentalize it. There’s power, power in love. If you don’t believe me, think about a time when you first fell in love. The whole world seemed to center around you and your beloved. There’s power, power in love, not just in its romantic forms, but any form, any shape of love. There’s a certain sense in which when you are loved and you know it, when someone cares for you and you know it, when you love and you show it. It actually feels right. There’s something right about it. There’s a reason for it. It has to do with the source.

We were made by a power of love. Our lives were meant and are meant to be lived in that love. That’s why we are here. Ultimately the source of love is God himself. The source of all of our lives.

There’s an old medieval poem that says: “Where true love is found, God himself is there.” The New Testament says it this way. “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is of God; And those who love are born of God and know God. Those who not love does not know God. Why? For God is love.”

There’s power in love. There’s power in love to help and heal when nothing else can. There’s power in love to lift up and liberate when nothing else will. There’s power in love to show us the way to live. (…) But love is not only about a young couple. The power of love is demonstrated by the fact that we’re all here. Two young people fell in love, and we all showed up. It’s not just for and about a young couple whom we rejoice with. It’s more than that.

Jesus of Nazareth on one occasion was asked by a lawyer to sum up the essence of the teachings of Moses. He went back and reached back to the Hebrew Scriptures to Deuteronomy and Leviticus, and Jesus said, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind and all your strength. This is the first and great commandment. The second is like it: love your neighbor as yourself. Then in Matthew’s version, he added, he said, on these two, love of God and love of neighbor, hang all the law, all the prophets, everything that Moses wrote, everything from the holy prophets, everything in the scriptures, everything that God has been trying to tell the world. Love God, love your neighbors, and while you’re at it, love yourself.

Someone once said that Jesus began the most revolutionary movement in human history: a movement ground on the unconditional love of God for the world and a movement mandating people to live and love.

And in so doing, to change not only their lives but the very life of the world itself! I’m talking about the power, real power, power to change the world.

If you don’t believe me, well, there were some old slaves in America’s Antebellum South, who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way. They sang a spiritual even in the midst of their captivity. It’s one that says there is a balm in Gilead, a healing balm, something that can make things right. There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole. There is a balm in Gilead to heal the sin sick soul. One of the stanzas explains why, it says, if you cannot preach like Peter, you cannot pray like Paul, you just tell the love of Jesus, how he died to save us all. That’s the balm in Gilead. This way of love is the way of life. They got it.

He died to save us all. He didn’t die for anything he could get out of it. Jesus did not get an honorary doctorate for dying. He wasn’t getting anything out of it. He gave up his life, he sacrificed his life for the good of others, for the well being of the world, for us. That’s what love is. Love is selfish or self-centered. Love can be sacrificial, and in so doing, become redemptive. That way of unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive love changes lives. And it can change this world.

Stop and imagine for a minute. Think and imagine. Think and imagine a world where love is the way.

Imagine our homes and families when love is the way. Imagine our neighborhoods and communities where love is the way. Imagine governments and nations where love is the way. Imagine business and commerce when love is the way. Imagine this tired, old world when love is the way. When love is the way — unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive — when love is the way, then no child will go to bed hungry in this world ever again. When love is the way, we will let justice roll down like a mighty stream, and righteousness like an ever-flowing brook.

When love is the way, poverty would become history. When love is the way, the earth will be a sanctuary. When love is the way, we will lay our swords and shields down by the riverside to study war no more. When love is the way, there’s plenty of room for all of God’s children. When love is the way, we actually treat each other, well, like we are actually family. When love is the way, we know that God is the source of us all, and we are brothers and sisters and children of God. Brothers and sisters — that’s a new heaven, a new earth, a new world, a new human family. Let me tell you something. Ole Solomon was right in the Old Testament. That’s fire.

French Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was arguably one of the great minds, great spirits of the 20th century. Jesuit, Roman Catholic priest, scientist, a scholar, a true mystic. Some of his writings from his scientific background as well as his theological one, some of his writings said as others have said that the discovery and harnessing of fire was one of the great technological discoveries of human history. Fire to a great extent made human civilization possible. Fire made it possible to cook food, and to provide sanitary ways of eating, which reduced the spread of disease in its time. Fire made it possible to heat warm environments and thereby marking human migration a possibility even into colder climates. Fire made it possible — there was no Bronze Age without fire, no Iron Age without fire, no Industrial Revolution without fire. … Anybody get here in a car today? An Automobile? Nod your heads if you did, I know there were some carriages. Those of us who came in cars, the controlled-harnessed fire made that possible.

I know that the Bible says, and I believe it that Jesus walked on water, but I have to tell you I didn’t walk across the Atlantic Ocean to get here. Controlled fire in that plane got me here. Fire makes it possible for us to text, and tweet, and email, and Instagram and Facebook and socially be dysfunctional with each other. Fire makes that possible, and de Chardin said fire was one of the great discoveries in all of human history. He went on to say if humanity ever harnesses the energy of fire again, if humanity ever captured the energies of love, it will be the second time in the history that will have discovered fire.

Dr. King was right. We must discover love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world.

My brother, my sister, God love you, God bless you. And may God hold us all in those almighty hands of love.”

'Shoplifters' wins Palme d'Or, grand prize to Spike Lee

A tumultuous Cannes Film Festival concluded Saturday with the Palme d'Or awarded to Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda's "Shoplifters," a tender portrait of a poor, impoverished family, while Harvey Weinstein accuser Asia Argento vowed justice will come to all sexual predators.

At the closing ceremony for the 71st edition of the French Riviera extravaganza, the Cate Blanchett-led jury selected one of the festival's most acclaimed entries, one hailed as a modest masterpiece from a veteran filmmaker renowned for his delicate touch. "Shoplifters" is about a small-time thief who takes a young girl home to his family; after seeing scars from abuse, they decide to keep her and raise her as their own.

While many speculated that the Cate Blanchett-led jury might award only the second Palme d'Or to a film directed by a woman, the most likely contender — Lebanese director Nadine Labaki's "Capernaum" — was instead given Cannes' jury prize. The film drew a rousing standing ovation at its premiere Thursday but less enthusiastic critic reviews for its tale of a 12-year-old boy living in poverty who sues his parents for bringing him into such a cruel world.

Spike Lee's "BlacKkKlansman," the highest profile American film in competition at Cannes, was awarded the grand prize. The film ignited the festival with its true tale of a black police detective who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan. Lee connected the film to modern day with real footage from last year's violent white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Virginia.

"I take this on the behalf of the People's Republic of Brooklyn, New York," said Lee, accepting his award.

The 12-day festival was the first since the downfall of Weinstein, who was for decades an annual fixture in Cannes. In the aftermath, this year's festival was shaken by debate over gender equality in the film industry and at Cannes. In a striking rally, 82 women — the same number of female filmmakers to ever be selected to Cannes competition lineup — stood on the Palais red-carpet steps in what Blanchett called "a symbol of our determination to change and progress."

Some changes were swift. Just days later, with Blanchett's jury looking on, Cannes' Artistic Director Thierry Fremaux signed a pledge to make the festival's selection process more transparent and promised other measures to improve the festival's record of including female filmmakers.

It was also a part of Saturday's closing ceremony. Argento raised a fist high on the red carpet. The actress has said Weinstein raped her at the Cannes Film Festival in 1997. (Weinstein has denied all accusations of non-consensual sex.)

"In 1997, I was raped by Harvey Weinstein here at Cannes. I was 21-years-old. This festival was his hunting ground," said Argento at the ceremony. "I want to make a prediction: Harvey Weinstein will never be welcomed here ever again."

"And even tonight, sitting among you, there are those who still have to be held accountable for their conduct against women for behavior that does not belong in this industry," said Argento. "You know who you are. But more importantly, we know who you are. And we're not going to allow you to get away with it any longer."

Following last year's Cannes, jury member Jessica Chastain was critical about the female representation on view in that year's films. Blanchett told reporters Saturday that her concerns were primarily behind the camera. Three of this year's 21 films in competition were directed by women.

"All of us, men and women alike on the jury would love to see more female directorial voices represented," said Blanchett. "I feel that there's a very strong drive within the organization of the Cannes Film Festival to make sure they explore, with a curious hat on, female perspectives. There perhaps weren't as many female driven narratives as I would have liked but there certainly some powerhouse female performances."

Polish filmmaker Pawel Pawlikowski took best director for his follow-up to the Oscar-winning "Ida," ''Cold War." Like "Ida," ''Cold War" is a black-and-white period film that delves into Polish history. The first Polish film in Cannes's competition in 37 years, "Cold War" is about an up-and-down romance in post-war Poland and Paris, behind and outside the Soviet Iron Curtain.

Pawlikowski has been critical of Poland's current right-wing government.

"I'm showing history through people, through emotions with all its complexities and paradoxes. To show history like that is really important these days, to go against the tendency to push everything into ideological narrative," he said. "The fact that it's appreciated here will make a difference in Poland. Poland is an interesting country. It's not how it appears to outsiders these days, believe me."

Best actress went to Samal Yeslyamova for Kazakh writer-director Sergey Dvortsevoy's "Ayka." Taking best actor was Marcello Fonte for Matteo Garrone's "Dogman," an award presented by fellow Italian actor Roberto Benigni.

The prize for best screenplay was split between Italian writer-director Alice Rohrwacher's time-warped fable about a poor farm boy in rural Italy "Happy as Lazzaro" and Nader Saeivar and Jafar Panahi's script for "Three Faces." On Sunday, Deadline reported that "Happy as Lazzaro" was acquired for North American distribution by Netflix, which pulled its films from Cannes this year in a dispute over theatrical distribution of its titles in France.

Panahi has been banned from traveling outside Iran since he was arrested for participating in "propaganda against the regime" in 2010 after supporting mass protests over the country's disputed 2009 election. Both Panahi and Russia's Kirill Serebrennikov were unable to attend their Cannes premieres because they are barred from traveling out of their home countries.

A "Palme d'Or Speciale," a special first-time award, was given to Jean-Luc Godard for "continually striving to define and refine what cinema can be," said Blanchett. Godard's "Image Book" is a film essay collage that contemplates the West's relationship to the Arab world. The 87-year-old French filmmaking legend called into his Cannes press conference via FaceTime.

The closing ceremony came ahead of the premiere of Terry Gilliam's "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote." Famously victim to countless delays and debacles, the film took nearly 30 years for Gilliam to complete. And its Cannes premiere was still almost canceled because of an injunction sought by producer Paolo Branco, who insisted the festival needed his permission. French courts last week denied Branco's request, allowing the screening to move forward.

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This story corrects the spelling of director Hirokazu Kore-eda.

Guess who's coming to Windsor? Royal ceremony weds cultures

With a gospel choir, black cellist and bishop, Oprah, Serena and Idris Elba in the audience and an African-American mother-of-the-bride, Saturday's wedding of Prince Harry to American actress Meghan Markle was a blend of the solemn and the soulful.

Guess who's coming to Windsor?

The ceremony married the pomp and circumstance of Britain's most sacred institution with elements of black culture, drawing viewers not normally drawn to the spectacle of the monarchy.

"This was black history," said Joy Widgeon, who attended a house party in Burlington, New Jersey, with her 6- and 8-year-old daughters in tow. "African-Americans were front and center at the royal wedding. This was the first time, and hopefully it won't be the last. I am here for it."

Race has loomed over the couple's relationship from the beginning. After the pair went public in 2016, Harry lashed out in a public statement at what he described as "racial undertones" in media coverage and overt racism toward his then-girlfriend, who has lamented such views. At the announcement of their engagement last fall, many black women around the world cheered the news as a fairytale that doesn't always include them.

Markle, 36, became the first black member of the British royal family in modern history. Her mother, Doria Ragland, is black. Her father is white.

A diverse group of about 20 — mostly black women — gathered before dawn on the rainy Saturday at a house party in Burlington, New Jersey, right outside Philadelphia. They were among the scores of African-Americans and British Americans participating in the global event in person, at home and online.

Decorated with a banner reading "Congratulations Harry and Meghan!," with the bride's biography on a nearby table and glasses of tea and mimosas and the smell of breakfast cooking in the background, the guests gathered in two rooms.

"We were keen to see who was going to look like us," said socialite David Alexander Jenkins, who has ridden horses in the same Windsor countryside where the wedding was held.

As Markle emerged from the burgundy Rolls Royce that brought her to St. George's Chapel, Paula Jackson gasped with approval.

"Oh, she looks lovely! Gorgeous! Beautiful!" Jackson exclaimed, wearing a jeweled blazer and sparkling tiara, sitting on a couch with a spot marked on a note in capital letters: RESERVED FOR THE QUEEN.

"I'm just so happy for her," Jackson said of Markle. "She will be an example for our young African-American women."

The couple also asked Presiding Bishop Michael Curry to participate in the ceremony. Elected the first African-American to his role in the Episcopal Church in 2015, Curry is based in Chicago. His theology, rooted in social justice, was on full display Saturday, as he invoked the words of the Rev. Martin Luther King in his lengthy address to the couple and audience.

For Angelita Byrd, the moment reminded her of being in church with her grandmother.

"He brought a little bit of Southern Baptist America to Europe," said Byrd, of Philadelphia. "You know what I love about all of this? She's adding a little spice to the royal family."

The bride personally called to invite 19-year-old cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason, who is black, to play at the wedding after Prince Harry saw him perform at a London event supporting an Antiguan charity. The diverse, Christian gospel group Kingdom Choir performed a stirring rendition of Ben E. King's "Stand By Me."

Church hats — a shared tradition in black and British culture — were a fashion highlight. And Markle's dress, designed by Givenchy, was reminiscent of the dress Princess Angela of Liechtenstein wore when she wed Prince Maximillian in their groundbreaking January 2000 ceremony.

Sanya Brown, already a fan of the royals who watched Princess Diana's funeral, as well as Prince William's wedding to Kate Middleton, initially planned to watch alone in her pajamas, but made a last-minute decision this week to watch with a girlfriend at her house in the west Philadelphia suburb of Wynnefield.

"In the time of the 'black girl magic' moment we are currently living in ... for this black girl from Los Angeles to be marrying into the royal family is a really dope and historic moment, so why not have that with someone and celebrate her magic?" she explained.

"We've seen (Harry), but never like this," Brown said. "This is different. She is different."

___

Whack is The Associated Press' national writer on race and ethnicity. Follow her work on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/emarvelous.

Acclaimed country musician Margo Price chats up ticket scalper outside own show

Concert ticket scalpers are often frowned upon by musicians and their fans, but one savvy country musician decided to engage one outside of her own show.

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Margo Price and her band performed at Variety Playhouse in Atlanta Thursday night. Before the show, Price was seen approaching a scalper selling tickets to her show. The interaction was caught on video and posted on Price's Twitter account.

Pointing to the marquee, Price asked, "Do you know this girl? Is she good?"

The scalper assured Price it's good music. Price promised to return to buy the tickets after going to the ATM.

This month, Price was nominated for artist, song and album of the year by the Americana Music Association for her latest album, "All American Made."

While some noted that the scalper was selling the tickets for $25, which was about face value, scalpers often sell fake tickets.

Georgia has strict ticket resale laws, but authorities admit enforcement is challenging.

Meghan Markle selects Givenchy dress for royal wedding

Meghan Markle chose French fashion label Givenchy for her royal wedding dress, designed by British designer Clare Waight Keller.

Markle and Waight Keller worked closely together on the design, according to Kensington Palace, highlighting Markle’s “minimal elegance.”

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The gown was made of pure silk, with an open neckline and slight A-line skirt.

Six meticulously placed seams helped create the lines of the dress. The lines of the dress extend to the train, which flowed in soft round folds that included an underskirt in triple silk organza.

Waight Keller researched the fabric by touring mills throughout Europe, according to the palace. She selected an exclusive double-bonded silk with a soft matte finish. 

Markle and Waight Keller chose the pure white color to reflect a “fresh modernity.”

The open bateau neckline framed Markle’s shoulders and she chose slim three-quarter length sleeves.

Markle’s veil was over 16 feet long and made from silk tulle with a trim of hand-embroidered flowers in silk and organza. 

Markle wanted to represent all 53 countries of the British Commonwealth family of nations in her dress, which are reflected by the flowers in the veil, according to Kensington Palace

Making sure each flower was unique took an enormous amount of time and care, Kensington Palace said

Each flower was flattened to create the unique and delicate design. Workers spent hundreds of hours sewing. The Palace said the workers had to wash their hands every 30 minutes to make sure the tulle and threads stayed pristine.

Markle also included some of her favorite flowers, including wintersweet, which grows on the grounds of Kensington Palace in front of Nottingham Cottage. She also chose the California poppy to represent her home state of California. 

In the very front of the veil, there are embroidered crops of wheat, symbolizing love and charity.

The look was completed with a tiara borrowed from Queen Elizabeth II. It is from Queen Mary’s collection held in the Queen’s vault, according to PEOPLE

The diamond bandeau in the tiara was created in 1932, with the center brooch dating to 1893.

Markle wore earrings and a bracelet by Cartier and a Welsh gold ring, given to her as a gift from the Queen, PEOPLE reports.

Markle followed in Princess Diana and Kate Middleton’s footsteps, who both chose British designers for their dresses. Princess Diana’s dress was designed by Elizabeth Emanuel and Middleton’s dress was designed by Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen, according to Marie Claire.

Waight Keller is the first female artistic director for Givenchy. She was named artistic director in 2017.

According to her biography on Givenchy’s website, Waight Keller launched her design career with Calvin Klein and Gucci. She also led the British label Chloe. 

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