Now Playing
Y100 FM
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Y100 FM

world

200 items
Results 51 - 60 of 200 < previous next >

Max Born’s identity: Google honors Nobel Prize-winning physicist who escaped Nazis

In honor of what would have been German physicist Max Born’s 135th birthday, the Google Doodle team put together a colorful illustration for the search engine’s home page.

>> Read more trending news

Born is remembered for his major contributions to quantum mechanics, a field of study that has led to the invention of computers, lasers, medical imaging devices and more.

Here are six things to know about Born and his groundbreaking work in quantum mechanics:

He was born in Breslau, Germany — now Wrocław, Poland.

According to Biography.com, Born was born into a family of “upper-class Jewish academics” on Dec. 11, 1882. His father was an anatomy and embryology professor and his mother, who died when Born was only four years old, came from a family of local industrialists.

He made his local university a renowned home for remarkable physicists.

Born was a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Göttingen, for 12 years. Several “soon-to-be-well-known” scientists joined the institution, including Werner Heisenberg, Enrico Fermi, J. Robert Oppenheimer and Maria Goeppert-Mayer.

He was friends with Albert Einstein.

Einstein and Born became friends while studying the theory of relativity. Born was a professor at his hometown university when he first met Einstein, according to Biography.com.

The two famously approached science in very different ways.

“Born, in holding that the basis of the material world was the purely random behaviour of the constituent particles of atoms, shared the majority viewpoint among quantum scientists; yet Einstein persisted in thinking that every event must have its cause, and searched constantly for a deeper explanation which might bring order into the seemingly chaotic sub- atomic world,” German theoretical physicist Werner Heisenberg wrote for a 1971 book on the two scientists’ friendship, “The Born Einstein Letters.”

In spite of their scientific differences, the two carried a close friendship for more than 40 years and often wrote to each other. Their correspondence was published in the 1971 book.

Born also worked with future Nobel prize winner Otto Stern in Frankfurt, Germany, after World War I.

Born was forced to emigrate to England when Hitler rose to power in Germany.

In 2013, Born’s son, Gustav Born, told BBC.com that in early 1933, Einstein told his father to “leave immediately” while they were still able to travel.

When Hitler took control of Germany, Born and his fellow Jewish scientist colleagues were not allowed to work at the local university and eventually packed their bags for England.

In 2011, Cambridge University unveiled a 1935 letter from Hitler himself expelling Born, the “father of quantum mechanics” from his post at Göttingen University.

Born had a to give up running the institute and his wife was heartbroken.

"They hated to be uprooted in this crude and dangerous way,” Gustav told BBC.com. "My parents were pretty sure this was a one-way journey."

In 1933, when Jewish academics such as Born were being threatened under Nazi Germany, Einstein gave a speech in support of the Academic Assistance Council, which aimed to rescue Jewish and politically vulnerable academics during Hitler’s rise to power in Germany. Watch:

He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1954 for the Born Rule.

Born earned the prize for his work in the field of quantum mechanics, specifically for the Born Rule, which Google described as “a quantum theory that uses mathematical probability to predict the location of wave particles in a quantum system.”

“In quantum mechanics, particles don’t have classical properties like ‘position’ or ‘momentum’; rather, there is a wave function that assigns a (complex) number, called the ‘amplitude,’ to each possible measurement outcome,” Caltech physicist Sean Carroll wrote in his blog. “The Born Rule is then very simple: it says that the probability of obtaining any possible measurement outcome is equal to the square of the corresponding amplitude.” 

Here’s the Born Rule equation: Probability(x) = |amplitude(x)|^2

Born’s theory now serves as the basis for almost all quantum physics predictions.

He died on Jan. 5, 1970.

Born died at age 87 at the Goettingen University Medical Clinic. According to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, his “death was caused by a heart ailment complicated by aerterial (sic) thrombosis.”

Can you find the camouflaged soldier hidden in this viral photo?

The British Army wants you to test its woodland camouflage. Do you see a soldier in this image?

>> See the tweet here

The British Army asked Twitter users to scan the photo — which reportedly was shot in Wales on the Section Commander’s Battle Course — to find the soldier in the scene.

>> Read more trending news 

A hint, in case you’re having any difficulty: The soldier is not standing up.

To make things a bit difficult, the soldier is wearing a woodland camouflage pattern designed to blend in with the misty forest terrain.

>> This coffee riddle has baffled the internet – can you solve it?

Is the British uniform good enough for you? If you haven’t found the answer yet, it’s here — the soldier lying prone, enveloped in mist, with just the perfectly round helmet giving any indication that it’s not all forest floor.

>> Click here or scroll down to see the answer..........

Back injury forces Lindsey Vonn to drop out of World Cup race

After injuring her back in a World Cup race Saturday, skiing champion Lindsey Vonn withdrew from another scheduled super-G event Sunday before the race was canceled because of fog.

>> Read more trending news

Vonn tweeted her decision 45 minutes before Sunday’s race was to start, saying she was focused on being healthy for the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Vonn, 33, hurt her back during her run in Saturday’s super-G race, CNN reported. She made it to the bottom of the slope, but slumped to the snow after crossing the finish line.

Related: Skier Lindsey Vonn says she won't represent Trump at Olympics

Vonn later tweeted she had an "acute facet (spinal joint) dysfunction. I got compressed on the 6th gate and my back seized up,” CNN reported.

Vonn finished 24th in Saturday's race, more than a second behind winner Jasmine Flury of Switzerland.

The Pyeongchang Olympics in South Korea will be held Feb. 9-25. The American star won the downhill title at the 2010 Vancouver Games but missed the 2014 Sochi Games because of injury.

Max Clifford, the 'King of Spin,' dies in UK prison

Max Clifford, a celebrity publicist whose clients included O.J Simpson, David Beckham and Simon Cowell, died in a British prison, CNN reported Sunday. He was 74.

>> Read more trending news

Nicknamed the “King of Spin,” Clifford was serving an eight-year prison term after his 2014 conviction for a series of indecent assaults on teenage girls, CNN reported.

Clifford was the first person to be convicted in an investigation into sex abuse allegations against late British TV host Jimmy Savile.

Clifford denied 11 accusations of sex abuse dating from 1966 to 1985, calling his arrest and prosecution “a nightmare.” 

“As with all deaths in custody there will be an investigation by the independent Prisons and Probation Ombudsman. Our condolences are with Mr. Clifford's family at this difficult time,” the ministry said in a statement. The cause of Clifford's death was “not self-inflicted” the statement said.

Must see: Dog interrupts tied soccer match

It’s not every day that a tied soccer game gets interrupted by a fan running on the pitch, especially when that fan is a four-footed furry one.

A husky appeared on the field during a match between teams from Macedonia and Norway, Business Insider reported.

>> Read more trending news

The game was tied 1-1 at the 73rd minute mark when the dog dropped in front of the Macedonian team’s goalkeeper to have its belly rubbed.

The entire event was caught on video.

Eventually, security was able to herd the dog to the tunnel so the game could continue and the match ended in a 1-1 tie.

Brexit breakthrough: UK, European Union reach agreement

The United Kingdom and the European Union have reached a preliminary agreement on Brexit, CNN reported Friday.

>> Read more trending news

British Prime Minister Theresa May arrived in Brussels on Friday morning following overnight talks on the issue of the Irish border, the BBC reported. After late-night talks with the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party, May said there would be no hard border between Northern Ireland and Ireland.

In Brussels, May met with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

“We had to make the deal today,” Juncker said, as a Dec. 14 deadline approached. “Sufficient progress has now been made on the three terms of the divorce,”

Negotiations for the United Kingdom to leave the EU can now proceed to the next stage, CNN reported.

“This hasn't been easy for either side,” May said. “Getting to this point has required give and take on both sides.”

The leader of the Democratic Unionist Party, Arlene Foster, said Friday she was “pleased” to see changes which mean there is "no red line down the Irish Sea,” the BBC reported.

Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney said the latest deal was a “very good outcome for everyone on the island of Ireland.”

The sticking points in the negotiations had been threefold: that rights of European citizens in the UK are guaranteed, that Britain pays a substantial "divorce bill,” and that there is no reinstatement of a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, CNN reported.

IOC suspends Russia from 2018 Winter Olympics

The Russian Olympic team has been suspended from competing in the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, several media outlets reported Tuesday. The International Olympic committee, however, opted to allow clean athletes to participate under the Olympic flag. 

>> Read more trending news

On its website, the IOC said Russian government officials are forbidden to attend the Games, the Russian flag will not be displayed during the opening ceremony, and its anthem will not be played. Any athletes from Russia who receive special dispensation to compete will do so as individuals, The New York Times reported.

Russian athletes or teams will participate under the name "Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR),” ESPN reported. Their uniforms will bear this name and they will participate under the Olympic flag. The Olympic anthem will be played in any ceremony during which a Russian athlete wins a gold medal.

The IOC handed out the unprecedented suspension after completing investigations about Russia’s alleged doping violations, the Times reported. Tuesday's action was based on the findings of the IOC's Schmid Commission, formed in July 2016 to examine the role of Russian officials and institutions in organized doping, ESPN reported. The commission relied heavily on the testimony of former Moscow laboratory director Grigory Rodchenkov.

The IOC ruled that Russia was guilty of executing a state-backed doping program. It did, however, leave the door open for Russian athletes who have passed rigorous drug tests to compete.

Those with histories of rigorous drug testing may petition for permission to compete in neutral uniforms. 

Rodchenkov's testimony, in concert with evidence unearthed and backed by forensic analysis in a World Anti-Doping Agency investigation, refute efforts by Russian government officials to distance themselves and portray Rodchenkov as a rogue actor, ESPN reported.

Supermoon 2017: 12 must-see photos that lit up social media

Did you miss the supermoon that delighted skygazers Sunday night? Here’s the good news: Photographers around the world shared must-see snapshots of the phenomenon on social media.

>> Click here or scroll down to see the photos

>> MORE PHOTOS: Supermoon 2017 around the world

>> Sunday supermoon kicks off trilogy of spectacular lunar viewing

>> Supermoon 2017: How to see, photograph the majestic ‘Full Cold Moon’ this weekend

>> Read more trending news

You’ll also get a chance to see other supermoons on Jan. 1 and Jan. 31, 2018.

Photos: Supermoon delights skygazers around the world

A trilogy of supermoons began Dec. 3, 2017, with a full cold moon that could be viewed in person or online. The other supermoons will occur Jan. 1 and Jan. 31, 2018.

Australia powers up the world’s biggest battery

The world’s largest lithium battery was activated in Australia on Friday, fulfilling the pledge by Tesla CEO Elon Musk to build it in 100 days or provide it for free, CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news

The electric car company’s Powerpack battery system stores energy generated by a nearby wind farm in South Australia, and it is capable of providing electricity for as many as 30,000 homes, CNN reported.

“South Australia is now leading the world in dispatchable renewable energy,” the state's premier, Jay Weatherill, said in a statement Friday. “This is history in the making."

Tesla said it hopes the project “provides a model for future deployments around the world.”

Musk made his “100 days or it's free” vow on Twitter during an exchange with Australian billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes, CNN reported. The promise began with the official contract was signed in September.

With the battery going online this week, Musk met his deadline. The battery was officially launched Friday, but Australian media reported that it started supplying power to the electricity grid Thursday during peak demand hours.

200 items
Results 51 - 60 of 200 < previous next >