Now Playing
Y100 FM
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Y100 FM

national govt & politics

200 items
Results 41 - 50 of 200 < previous next >

Trump tombstone at elementary school's Halloween party stirs controversy

A Halloween party at an elementary school in Gloucester, Massachusetts, featured a controversial decoration – a tombstone with the president's name on it

>> Watch the news report here

Apparently, one of the parents brought the tombstone labeled "Don Trump" to West Parish Elementary School's recent "Halloween Happenings" party. 

"It's not a place to put out a political agenda of any kind. And it upsets me that somebody would think it was appropriate to expose young children to it," said Amanda Orlando Kesterson, chair of the Gloucester Republican Committee. 

It's no surprise Kesterson is defending a Republican president, but she also maintains she would do the same for any president, regardless of politics.

>> Read more trending news

"I had very many difficulties with many of the things President Obama did ... but the office of the president deserves respect," Kesterson said. 

She says the tombstone wasn't removed even after she complained to the principal about it. 

"While, according to the parent, this was designated to be humorous, a number of attendees rightfully felt that it showed disrespect," Telena S. Imel, the principal of West Parish Elementary, said in a statement. "In planning future events, it will be made clear to organizers that school is not the place to engage in or display political agendas or opinions." 

George H.W. Bush apologizes after actress Heather Lind accuses him of sexual assault

Former President George H.W. Bush is apologizing to an actress who claims he groped her during a private screening.

The incident allegedly took place in 2014.

Actress Heather Lind, who works on the AMC show "Turn Washington’s Spies," said the former president, now 93, grabbed her behind and told her a dirty joke right before a photo was taken.

Lind detailed the entire incident in a now-deleted Instagram post.

>> Read more trending news 

She claims former first lady Barbara Bush saw the whole thing and just rolled her eyes.

Bush's spokesman, Jim McGrath, issued an apology in a statement to People Wednesday morning. 

“President Bush would never – under any circumstance – intentionally cause anyone distress, and he most sincerely apologizes if his attempt at humor offended Ms. Lind,” the statement said.

By late Tuesday, Bush’s office issued another statement.

“At age 93, President Bush has been confined to a wheelchair for roughly five years, so his arm falls on the lower waist of people with whom he takes pictures,” the statement said. “To try to put people at ease, the president routinely tells the same joke -- and on occasion, he has patted women’s rears in what he intended to be a good-natured manner. Some have seen it as innocent; others clearly view it as inappropriate. To anyone he has offended, Pres. Bush apologizes most sincerely.”

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Sen. Jeff Flake announces he will not seek re-election

Sen. Jeff Flake, a frequent critic of President Donald Trump, announced Tuesday that he won’t seek re-election in 2018 amid the tumultuous state of U.S. national politics.

>> Read more trending news

Flake, R-Arizona, told The Arizona Republic that he has become convinced "there may not be a place for a Republican like me in the current Republican climate or the current Republican Party."

Trump-Corker feud reignites amid tax reform push

President Donald Trump and Sen. Bob Corker renewed their simmering feud on Tuesday morning, with the president writing in a tweet that Corker “couldn't get elected dog catcher” after the Tennessee Republican urged the White House to leave tax reform to Congress. 

>> Read more trending news

“Bob Corker, who helped President O give us the bad Iran Deal & couldn't get elected dog catcher in Tennessee, is now fighting Tax Cuts,” Trump wrote in the first of a series of tweets blasting the senator.

>> Related: Trump-Corker feud heats up as senator says president's threats could lead to 'World War III'

“Corker dropped out of the race in (Tennessee) when I refused to endorse him, and now is only negative on anything Trump. Look at his record!”

Sgt. La David Johnson's widow: Trump said, 'He knew what he signed up for'

The widow of a U.S. Army soldier killed in an ambush attack earlier this month in Niger confirmed a congresswoman’s account of a call between her and President Donald Trump on Monday, saying that the president told her that her husband “knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyway.”

>> Read more trending news

Sgt. La David Johnson, 25, was one of four Army soldiers killed in Niger during what officials have described as an advise-and-assist mission in southwestern Niger. The Defense Department identified the other slain soldiers as Staff Sgt. Bryan Black, 35, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Johnson, 39, and Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29.

Myeshia Johnson, widow of La David Johnson, told “Good Morning America” on Monday that she is demanding answers in her husband’s death.

>> Related: 4 soldiers killed in ambush: Where is Niger and what are U.S. troops doing there? 

“The president said that he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyway,” Myeshia Johnson said, recalling a phone call made by the president as she and her family headed to the airport to pick up La David Johnson’s remains. “It made me cry (because) I was very angry at the tone of his voice and how he said he couldn’t remember my husband’s name. The only way he remembered my husband’s name is because he told me he had my husband’s report in front of him, and that’s when he actually said ‘La David.’”

The president took to Twitter to deny Myeshia Johnson’s account, writing on Monday morning that he “had a very respectful conversation with the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson.”

He said he “spoke his name from (the) beginning, without hesitation.”

“I heard him stumbling on trying to remember my husband’s name, and that’s what hurt me the most, because if my husband is out here fighting for our country and he risked his life for our country, why can’t you remember his name?” Myeshia Johnson said Monday.

Myeshia Johnson told “Good Morning America” that the president called the phone of the master sergeant and that she asked the master sergeant to put the phone on speaker, so that her aunt and uncle could hear the call as well. She said that’s how Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Florida, heard the president tell her that her husband “knew what he signed up for.”

>> Related: Funeral held for soldier at center of Trump rift

Trump denied the account multiple times last week, and White House officials slammed Wilson for listening to a conversation between the president and an Army widow.

“Whatever Ms. Wilson said was not fabricated,” Myeshia Johnson told “Good Morning America.” “What she said was 100 percent correct. ... Why would we fabricate something like that?”

The circumstances surrounding the ambush, which happened on Oct. 4, remain under investigation. Among other outstanding questions, authorities are working to determine how, why and when La David Johnson was separated from the team that was ambushed.

>> Related: Who was Sgt. La David Johnson: 7 things to know about the fallen soldier, 'Wheelie King' 

“They didn't know where he was or where to find him, and a couple (of) days later is when they told me that he went from missing to killed in action,” Myeshia Johnson said. “I don’t know how he got killed, where he got killed or anything. I don’t know that part, they never told me, and that’s what I’ve been trying to find out since day one, since October 4th.”

La David Johnson’s body was found by Nigerian forces, according to the Defense department.

“They told me that he’s in a severe, a severe wrap like I won’t be able to see him,” Myeshia Johnson told “Good Morning America.”

“I know my husband’s body from head to toe. And they won’t let me see anything. I don’t know what’s in that box, it could be empty for all I know. But I need, I need to see my husband. I haven’t seen him since he came home.”

John McCain takes apparent jab at Trump during interview about Vietnam War

Sen. John McCain appeared to take a swipe at President Donald Trump during an interview about the Vietnam War on CSPAN-3 American History TV, criticizing people from “the highest income level” who avoided the military draft by finding a doctor who would say that “they had a bone spur,” CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news

Trump attended the New York Military Academy as a young man and received five military draft deferments during the Vietnam War, CNN reported. One was a medical deferment after he was diagnosed with bone spurs in his foot. 

It’s the latest war of words between the Arizona Republican and the president. During the early stages of the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump claimed McCain was not a was hero because he was captured during the Vietnam War. Trump never apologized for the remarks, and McCain has since been one of his most vocal Republican critics in Congress, CNN reported.

“One aspect of the conflict, by the way, that I will never ever countenance is that we drafted the lowest income level of America and the highest income level found a doctor that would say they had a bone spur,” McCain told C-SPAN3. “That is wrong. That is wrong. If we are going to ask every American to serve, every American should serve.”

McCain never mentions Trump by name in the interview, but the President's deferment because of a bone spur is widely known and his family was well off at the time.

Trump told The New York Times in 2016 that a doctor "gave me a letter -- a very strong letter -- on the heels."

"Over a period of time, it healed up," he said.

McCain spent five years as a prisoner of war during the Vietnam War, declining to be released despite being the son of an admiral.

Jimmy Carter says he’d go to North Korea to help ease tensions

Jimmy Carter said he “would go” to North Korea as an emissary for President Donald Trump, the former president told New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd.

>> Read more trending news

In a wide-ranging interview that covered topics such as the relationship between Trump and Russian president Vladimir Putin, Carter told Dowd he was eager to partner with the president on a diplomatic mission to North Korea.

Carter told Dowd he would be willing to go to North Korea amid the ongoing tensions over nuclear weapons.

"I would go, yes," he said.

Carter, 93, said he has talked with Trump's national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster, about his intentions but was given "a negative response."

"I told him that I was available if they ever need me," he said.

It would not be the first time Carter collaborated with a president or traveled to North Korea in a diplomatic mission. In 2010, he negotiated the release of an imprisoned U.S. citizen.

Carter also flew to North Korea in 1994 over the objections of President Bill Clinton and made a deal with Kim Il-sung to help prevent a nuclear confrontation.

North Carolina politician sparks controversy with tweet comparing Trump to Hitler

A Charlotte city councilwoman is under scrutiny for a controversial tweet she posted comparing President Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler.

Councilwoman LaWana Mayfield posted the tweet Friday morning, which reads in part: “For All who read about Hitler you are Now Living how he reigned in #45."

WSOC spoke with members of the community for reactions to Mayfield’s statement.

"I don't think it's appropriate,” Charlotte resident Ulga Mazets said. 

Mazets is from eastern Europe and said her family was impacted by Hitler’s reign.

“My grandfather was in (a) concentration camp, so I feel it's a very harsh comparison,” she said.

>> Read more trending news

Others felt the comparison was inappropriate but said Mayfield had the right to make it.

“Everybody got their own opinion,” a Charlotte resident said.

Earlier this year, one of Mayfield’s fellow council members, Dimple Ajmera, landed in hot water when she said Trump supporters have no place leading Charlotte government.

[READ MORE: Councilwoman receives death threats following Trump comments]

Ironically, Mayfield just called for an investigation into a Charlotte Housing Authority worker who allegedly posted a tweet on Facebook applauding the death of Keith Lamont Scott, who was shot by police during an incident that sparked a nationwide debate.

University of North Carolina - Charlotte professor Anita Blanchard said these types of comments on social media are becoming more common.

She said leaders and those who use social media platforms should learn to be more media savvy.

“Finding a way to say something that’s not rude that still gets your point across,” she said.

Mayfield didn’t immediately respond to Channel 9’s calls about the tweet, but she tweeted again Friday afternoon saying, “I wish the media would question #45 about why we were in Niger.”

Mayfield is up for re-election. Her Republican opponent Daniel Herrera sent WSOC the following statement:

"I have heard of my opponent's divisive, and inflammatory tweet of political rhetoric comparing the President of the United States to Hitler, pure evil and everything President Trump and I stand to oppose. 

While LaWana Mayfield only wishes to divide our community by using the power of fear to distract from her failures. I stand to change and unite District Three. I will move us forward with policies that support safer streets that allow mail to be delivered and not canceled because of street violence. I have a real plan to promote affordable housing rather than subsidized soccer stadiums that only support the developers who own her vote. I will always represent my faith and never write a policy like her devastating bathroom bill, the one she spearheaded and forced upon our Queen City and which brought so much distrain to our community.

Shame on Mayfield for her continuation of divisive political tactics. Shame on her for disrespecting the over 400,000 Defenders of Freedom who fell beneath our flag to defeat Hitler." 

Mayfield's statement in response to the backlash:

"The Constitutional right of "Free Speech" is a precious and uniquely beloved gift among Americans. With this gift of free speech comes great responsibility. To some, I did not express that responsibly within the limited characters of my earlier tweet. I apologize for the brevity of my statement due to being limited to 140 characters. Many times, we cannot fully express intent or emotion through this limited platform."

"I do not want to diminish the heinous treatment and genocide that our Jewish brothers and sisters experienced at the hands of this dictator nor do I want to further create a dialogue that does not focus on the facts at hand."

"Today, we read about history as a story in a book and sometimes disassociate from the realities of lives impacted. Our communities must unite and realize that at this intersectionality of both conservative and liberal, white and people of color, gay or straight, young and seniors, these variances and diverse populations have strength when they unite in one voice."

"My anger and passion when tweeting was directed to those that continue to make excuses for a man who is leading our Nation in a divisive direction. His policies, the creation of the 'Birther movement,' executive orders and continual mistreatment of marginalized communities has quickly eroded the landscape of civility and civil discourse in our society. 

"I value the diversity of my community, work to be inclusive and give voice to those that are not at the table and bring equity to this city that I love.""While my words chosen have offended some, my intent was to bring attention to the continued crisis that we face each day while this president is leading us. My post angered some and I stay in a state of anger every day I watch the news and this like many posts was shared to shine a light on hypocrisy and the discourse rising in our nation."

Georgia Rep. Betty Price suggests ‘quarantine’ for HIV patients

Georgia Rep. Betty Price, R-Roswell, in a study committee this week, asked if the government could “quarantine” people with HIV.

>> Read more trending news 

Price is married to Tom Price, who recently resigned as U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services.

Her comments came in a discussion of the spread of HIV and disparities in care within the state. The committee is dedicated to examining and addressing barriers to access to healthcare in Georgia.

“And I don’t want to say the quarantine word, but I guess I just said it,” Price said. “Is there an ability, since I would guess that public dollars are expended heavily in prophylaxis and treatment of this condition. So we have a public interest in curtailing the spread. What would you advise, or are there any methods legally that we could do that would curtail the spread?”

According to an official biography, Price was conferred her Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) at McGill University in Montreal. 

“She worked for over 20 years in the medical field practicing Anesthesiology in Roswell and Marietta (Georgia),” the biography reads. “She served on the Boards of the Medical Association of Atlanta and the Medical Association of Georgia and is a past president of the American Medical Women’s Association in Atlanta.” 

HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. Price’s statements were first reported by Project Q Atlanta.

4 soldiers killed in ambush: Where is Niger and what are U.S. troops doing there?

Questions remain in the aftermath of an ambush attack on a group including U.S. Army soldiers in Niger that left four American service members dead on Oct. 4.

>> Read more trending news

Defense Department officials said Staff Sgt. Bryan Black, 35, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Johnson, 39, Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29 and Sgt. La David Johnson, 25, were killed in an attack during an advise-and-assist mission in southwestern Niger.

The circumstances that led to the attack remain under investigation.

The American military operation in Niger is one of about 20 in Africa and part of the U.S. Africa Command, according to NPR. The command is aimed at building military relations with African nations and other key players in the region. It began operations in 2007.

Here is what we know about Niger and U.S. military presence in the country:

Where is Niger?

Niger is a landlocked country in western Africa, bordered by Chad, Nigeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Mali, Algeria and Libya.

The country became independent from France in 1960. Political instability and a series of military coups followed.

Is Niger generally safe for Americans?

The U.S. State Department in April issued a warning for Americans traveling in Niger to stay away from “locations frequented by Westerners” and to keep to hotels with armed Nigerien security officers because of the risk of terror attacks and kidnapping threats against Westerners.

“Niger’s southeastern border with Nigeria and east of Maradi are poorly controlled,” State Department officials said. “Boko Haram and several factions affiliated with ISIS have conducted cross-border attacks into Niger. The government of Niger has increased its security forces in the border areas, but the situation remains unstable and travel is not advised.”

What about for soldiers – is it generally safe?

Despite the threat of violence, officials said the Oct. 4 deaths were the first American service members to be killed in combat in Niger.

“I think clearly there's risk for our forces in Niger,” said Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Kenneth F. McKenzie, the director of the Joint Staff. “Any time we deploy full forces globally, we will look very hard at the enablers that need to be in place in order to provide security for them. And that ranges from the ability to pull them out if they are injured, to the ability to reinforce them at the point of a fight if they … need reinforcement. We look at all those things and evaluate on a continual basis.”

How big is the American military presence there?

Officials with the Defense Department said this month that about 1,000 troops in the region work with about 4,000 French service members. The U.S. military has had some presence in the country since 2012, according to CNN.

What are U.S. soldiers doing there?

Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White said U.S. armed forces have been working for years with West African nations to combat the threat of terrorism.

The Army soldiers killed in the Oct. 4 attack were assisting with Nigerien security force counterterrorism operations about 125 miles north of Niamey, the country’s capitol city, according to thee Defense Department.

“We’re providing refueling support, intelligence support, surveillance support,” Defense Secretary James Mattis said. “But also we have troops on the ground. Their job is to help the people in the region learn how to defend themselves. We call it foreign internal defense training, and we actually do these kinds of missions by, with and through our allies.”

200 items
Results 41 - 50 of 200 < previous next >