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Judge blocks third version of Trump's travel ban

A federal judge in Hawaii on Tuesday blocked a third version of President Donald Trump's travel ban.

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The ban was scheduled to go into effect at midnight and targeted eight nations, six of which have populations that are majority Muslim.

The state of Hawaii, the Muslim Association of Hawaii and others sought a temporary restraining order to stop the travel ban from going into effect, Politico reported.

Hillary Clinton defends NFL players kneeling for the national anthem

While on tour promoting her book “What Happened,” Hillary Clinton defended NFL players who kneel during the national anthem, arguing that they’re neither protesting the anthem nor the flag and calling their display “reverent.”

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That’s what black athletes kneeling was all about,” she said in response to a question about how to resist the Trump White House. “That’s not against our anthem or our flag. Actually, kneeling is a reverent position. It was to demonstrate in a peaceful way against racism and injustice in our criminal system.”

Former NFL star Colin Kaepernick sought to protest racial injustice in the United States last season, beginning by sitting on the bench for the national anthem. After speaking with former NFL player and Green Beret Nate Boyer, he decided to simultaneously protest and show respect by kneeling for the song instead.

“We sorta came to a middle ground where he would take a knee alongside his teammates,” Boyer said after their meeting. “Soldiers take a knee in front of a fallen brother’s grave, you know, to show respect. When we’re on a patrol, you know, and we go into a security halt, we take a knee, and we pull security.”

President Donald Trump recently began attacking players who kneel during the anthem, calling them “sons of (expletive)” and imploring team owners to fire players who participate in the protest.

Taliban hostage rescued after 5 years in captivity didn't believe Trump was president

A Canadian man who had been held in Afghanistan for five years by Taliban-tied kidnappers revealed that he thought his kidnapper was joking when he said Donald Trump was president of the United States.

Joshua Boyle said one of his captors told him Trump was president just before he was forced to film a “proof-of-life” video, according to the Toronto Star.

>> Read more trending news

“It didn’t enter my mind that he was being serious,” Boyle said.

The Boyle family, including Joshua, his American-born wife, Caitlan Coleman, and their three young children, who were all born in captivity, were rescued by Pakistani forces after U.S. intelligence informed them of the of the family’s location.

The family was in the trunk of a car being transferred to another location when their kidnappers engaged in a shootout with Pakistani forces. Some of their kidnappers died in the fight while others fled, but the entire family made it to safety.

University of Florida to host white supremacist event, expects $500,000 in security costs

The University of Florida plans on spending $500,000 to “enhance security on campus” and in Gainesville, Florida, for white nationalist Richard Spencer’s speaking event Thursday.

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The money will include costs not only for the University of Florida Police Department, but also for the Gainesville Police Department, Alachua County Sheriff’s Office, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Florida Highway Patrol and other agencies providing first responders, the university said.

Spencer was to be a featured speaker at the August rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, at which one person died, but authorities stopped the event from taking place after protests and counterprotests turned violent.

The university will recoup $10,564 from Spencer’s National Police Institute for the two-hour rental of the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. However, it cannot pass along the balance of these costs -- enough to pay the annual tuitions of about 75 undergraduate students, according to university estimates -- to him under a 1992 U.S. Supreme Court free-speech ruling.

UF plans to remain open during the event, but access to campus buildings will be tightly restricted, and its faculty has been asked to be understanding of students who are fearful to be on campus that day.

University president Kent Fuchs has condemned Spencer’s message multiple times and has urged faculty and students not to attend the event, which is scheduled to run from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

“UF has been clear and consistent in its denunciation of all hate speech and racism, and in particular the racist speech and white nationalist values of Mr. Spencer,” Fuchs wrote Oct. 10. “I personally find the doctrine of white supremacy abhorrent and denounce all forms of racism and hate.”

Following the white nationalist Charlottesville rally in August, Spencer and the National Policy Institute requested to rent a facility at UF on Sept. 12. The university originally denied the request citing violence from Charlottesville and threats toward UF. After Spencer’s group spoke of suing under free speech laws, the university switched positions to allow Spencer to rent the space, which often used by visiting speakers. He was not invited or sponsored by UF or any of its organizations.

In the days leading up the event, UF organizations and Gainesville businesses have denounced Spencer’s message.

UF Hillel, a nonprofit organization for Jewish students, will provide a safe space guarded by security on Thursday and hold a “Solidarity Shabbat” on Friday with other UF organizations “to show unity and strength.”

Alligator Brewing Co., located in Tall Paul’s Brew House just east of campus in downtown Gainesville, announced on Oct. 12 that everyone 21 and older who brought in two tickets for Spencer’s event would receive a free draft beer. However, plans for free beer fell through when NPI decided to distribute its own tickets instead of using the Phillips Center’s box office, the university said. NPI posted on its Facebook page that it will post updates of ticket information on the page and Spencer’s Twitter account.

A Facebook group called “No Nazis at UF” created a Facebook event announcement to protest Spencer, which has more than 460 people marked as going to the event and more than 870 marked as interested in attending.

“We must stand together in the fight against white supremacy and fascism, and defend the most marginalized of our communities,” the group wrote.

The group started an online petition on change.org to UF administration showing its displeasure with the university allowing Spencer to speak. It had recorded more than 3,300 signatures as of Monday morning.

On Monday, No Nazis at UF’s organizers held a news conference on campus with protest signs in tow. They marched to Fuchs’ office but were denied access.

Larry Flynt offering up to $10M for information leading to Trump's impeachment

Hustler founder Larry Flynt is looking for information that will lead to President Donald Trump's impeachment – and he's willing to pay for it.

According to The Associated Press, the 74-year-old pornography publisher placed a full-page ad in Sunday's Washington Post to "announce a cash offer of up to $10 million" for the information. See the ad here.

"I do not expect any of Trump's billionaire cronies to rat him out, but I am confident that there are many people in the know for whom $10 million is a lot of money," the ad reads. "And just because you pay for information doesn't mean it's not good. Make no mistake, I fully intend to pay this entire sum."

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The ad continues: "Sure, I could use that $10 million to buy luxuries or further my businesses, but what good would that do me in a world devastated by the most powerful moron in history? I feel it is my patriotic duty, and the duty of all Americans, to dump Trump before it's too late."

This isn't the first time Flynt has offered money to derail Trump. The AP reported that Flynt offered $1 million during the 2016 presidential campaign for video or audio of Trump "behaving in an illegal or sexually demeaning manner."

Read more here.

President Trump says you'll be hearing 'Merry Christmas' a lot more this year

Declaring victory on the “war on Christmas” at Friday’s Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C., President Trump said he’ll be saying “Merry Christmas” during his first holiday season as president.

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“We’re getting near that beautiful Christmas season that people don’t talk about anymore. They don’t use the word ‘Christmas’ because it’s not politically correct,” he said, explaining that politically correct culture has made it difficult to celebrate the holiday. “You go to department stores, and they’ll say ‘Happy New Year,’ or they’ll say other things, and it’ll be red -- they’ll have it painted -- but they don’t say -- Well, guess what? We’re saying ‘Merry Christmas’ again.”

The crowd at the Christian public policy conference went wild, cheering on the president as he went on to call for tax reform, calling the possibility a “Christmas gift.”

President Trump has frequently used the “war on Christmas” to fire up the evangelical Christian wing of his base, saying on the campaign trail that political correctness prohibits people from proudly celebrating Christian holidays such as Christmas.

“So, when I started 18 months ago, I told my first crowd in Wisconsin that we are going to come back here someday, and we are going to say Merry Christmas again,” he said at the time. “Merry Christmas. So, Merry Christmas everyone.”

Iran nuclear deal: What to know about Trump's aggressive new strategy

UPDATE 1:30 p.m. ET:

President Donald Trump said Friday during a news conference that Iran is not living up to the “spirit” of the nuclear deal signed in 2015.

Trump criticized the deal, calling it “one of the worst” and most “one-sided transactions the United States has ever entered into.”  

>> Full transcript: Read President Trump’s remarks about the Iran nuclear deal 

The president’s new strategy will include tougher sanctions that will aim to deny the Iranian regime all paths to nuclear weapons.

>> Here is President Trump’s new strategy on Iran

ORIGINAL REPORT:

President Donald Trump is expected to announce an aggressive new strategy toward Iran on Friday, disavowing the 2015 nuclear accord that was negotiated by his predecessor, Barack Obama. But Trump will stop short -- at least for now -- of scrapping the agreement or even rewriting it.

>> Read more trending news

"It is time for the entire world to join us in demanding that Iran’s government end its pursuit of death and destruction,” Trump said in a statement released early Friday.

Here are some things to know about Trump’s actions on the accord, which was signed by the United States, Iran, Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China and the European Union.

  • In his remarks, scheduled for 12:45 p.m. Friday, Trump will declare his intention not to certify Iran’s compliance with the deal. But the move does not amount to tearing up the deal, which was a promise he made during his run for the presidency in 2016.

  • Trump will send the agreement to Congress, which will have 60 days to determine a policy. 

  • If Congress imposes new punitive economic sanctions on Iran, the nuclear deal likely would fall through. However, Trump wants legislators to adopt new measures to keep it in place and define parameters by which the United States would impose new sanctions in the event Iran violates its agreements.

  • Some of the violations could be defined as continued ballistic launches by Iran, refusal to extend its constraints on the production of nuclear fuel, or if U.S. intelligence agencies conclude that Iran could produce a nuclear weapon in a year or less.

  • Two times, Trump reluctantly certified the deal, but told his top advisers that he would no longer do it. To do so, he asserted, would make it appear that the president was breaking his campaign process.

  • Iran has rejected reopening the accord or negotiating a new one. 

In his statement Friday, Trump said his decision was the “culmination of nine months of deliberation” with Congress and U.S. allies on how to best protect American security.

Trump nominates Kirstjen Nielsen for Homeland Security secretary

President Donald Trump on Thursday nominated White House Deputy Chief of Staff Kirstjen Nielsen as his Homeland Security secretary.

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“It’s hard to imagine a more qualified candidate for this critical position,” Trump said.

Delta CEO on Donald Trump’s wall: ‘We’re going to fly over that damn thing’

In May, Delta Air Lines began a joint venture with Aeromexico. The latter gets connections to Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul, New York, Salt Lake City and Seattle.

>> Read more trending news 

Delta gets greater access to Mexico through Aeromexico hubs in Mexico City, Monterrey and Guadalajara. The U.S. airline now has a 49 percent stake in Aeromexico. Delta CEO Ed Bastian sits on Aeromexico’s board.

With that investment come certain opinions

“We truly look at Aeromexico as an extension of Delta,” Bastian said Monday in a speech to annual convention of the Hispanic Corporate Council of Atlanta event held at the Delta Flight Museum, according to Global Atlanta reporter Trevor Williams. “I don’t know what they’re going to do with the wall they keep talking about, but we’re going to fly over that damn thing, whatever it is. We’re not going to let a little wall get in the way of progress and taking care of people.”

Bastian didn’t mention the name of President Donald Trump, the Global Atlanta report noted. But the Delta CEO also added this:

“There’s a lot of anxiety, a lot of fear that cuts into the heart of who we are as a society. It’s caused a lot of people to wonder what’s going on and where are we going,” he said.

The remarks don’t come in a vacuum. Consider this Monday report from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Kelly Yamanouchi:

“Delta Air Lines is caught in the cross-hairs of a Trump administration ‘Buy American’ fight against the carrier’s deal to buy jets from a Canadian aircraft manufacturer (Bombardier).

“Atlanta-based Delta negotiated low prices to purchase 75 Bombardier jets along with options for 50 more aircraft. That move prompted rival Boeing to allege that Bombardier was getting illegal subsidies and dumping its product into the U.S. market.

After slapping Bombardier with a proposed duty of nearly 220 percent, the Trump administration has turned up the heat by adding an anti-dumping duty of nearly 80 percent.

Read more at Delta, AJC and Global Atlanta.

Trump threatens network's license after report he wanted to expand nuclear arsenal

President Donald Trump on Wednesday suggested that he might challenge the licenses of TV networks that are critical of him, pointing to reports that he has categorized as “fake news.”

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The suggestion was made on Twitter after NBC News reported early Wednesday that the president wanted to expand the U.S. nuclear arsenal tenfold over the summer and suggested as much in a meeting with high-ranking national security officials.

The comment was made during a July 20 meeting that included Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, according to NBC News.

During the meeting, the president was shown a slide that depicted the decrease in U.S. nuclear weapons that started in the late 1960s, the news station reported.

>> Related: Trump suggests his IQ is higher than Tillerson's after reported 'moron' jab

“Trump indicated he wanted a bigger stockpile, not the bottom position on that downward-sloping curve,” NBC News reported, adding that those present were surprised by the request. “Officials briefly explained the legal and practical impediments to a nuclear buildup and how the current military posture is stronger than it was at the height of the buildup.”

After the meeting, NBC News reported, Tillerson was heard calling the president a “moron,” a remark that the president has called “totally phony.” The State Department last week denied that Tillerson called Trump a moron, although the secretary declined to deny the report himself.

>> Related: Tillerson slams reports he considered resigning, called Trump a 'moron'

Trump denied on Wednesday afternoon that he ever suggested the United States increase its nuclear arsenal.

“I never said that,” he said during a news briefing with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. “Right now we have so many nuclear weapons I want them in perfect condition, perfect state. ... It’s frankly disgusting the way the press is able to write whatever they want to write and someone should look into it.”

His comments Wednesday afternoon echoed ones he made earlier in the day on Twitter.

“Fake @NBCNews made up a story that I wanted a ‘tenfold’ increase in our U.S. nuclear arsenal,” Trump wrote. “Pure fiction, made up to demean. NBC = CNN!”

He followed with a second tweet calling NBC News “bad for (the) country.”

“With all of the Fake News coming out of NBC and the Networks, at what point is it appropriate to challenge their License?” Trump wrote. “Bad for country!”

The president’s suggestion is unlikely to do much to ease his frustrations. The Los Angeles Times reported that NBC and other networks don’t hold licenses that cover their entire networks. Instead, licenses are issued to local stations.

“Under deregulatory measures that Republicans successfully pushed over the past generation, challenging a license on the grounds that coverage is unfair or biased would be extremely difficult,” the newspaper reported.

It’s not the first time Trump has threatened news organizations that are critical of him.

During the race for the White House and again in March, Trump suggested that it might be worth loosening libel laws in order to make it easier for people to challenge inaccurate stories, Bloomberg News reported.

Last week, the president asked in a tweet why the Senate Intelligence Committee was not looking at American media companies.

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