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67-year-old Jane Seymour poses for ‘Playboy,’ ‘I feel much sexier now’ 

Elegant actress Jane Seymour is about to grace the pages of “Playboy” magazine at 67-years-old.

>> Read more trending news 

The former Bond girl took to social media Wednesday to share a modest photograph from her upcoming spread in the iconic men’s magazine.

“I’m thrilled to finally share this with you! I was recently photographed and interviewed in my home by Playboy,” Seymour captioned the image on Instagram.

“I open up about my career, my family, feeling better-than-ever at 67 and so much more,” she wrote.

This is the “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman” star’s third spread in “Playboy.”

The legendary actress told the magazine that her age hasn’t diminished her confidence.

“I feel much sexier now than I ever did when I was younger” she said.

“Then I was like, ‘Oh gosh, I’m supposed to be sexy. What is that?!’ There’s an enormous freedom in having lived as long as I have,” she added. “Like my father used to say, I’m comfortable in my own skin.”

And there’s no doubt that she’s all natural.

“I haven’t done any surgeries or injections or anything. I haven’t done any of it,” she explained.

>> Related: Tennis champ Serena Williams reveals she ‘almost died’ in childbirth

“So I still look like ‘me.’ Everyday I’m kind of tempted, but then I look at people I know and I don’t [recognize] them. I’m authentically being me. That’s important to me.”

Snap Inc.’s stock falls after Kylie Jenner tweet about Snapchat redesign

Kylie Jenner may be one of many Snapchat users who isn’t happy about the app’s redesign.

The 20-year-old new mom asked her followers on Tuesday if anyone else no longer uses the app.

>> Read more trending news 

“So does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me,” she wrote. “Ugh this is so sad.”

Bloomberg reported that the timing of the tweet may have caused a drop in stock for Snap Inc., the company that owns Snapchat.

“Shares sank as much as 7.2 percent Thursday, wiping out $1.3 billion in market value, on the heels of a tweet from Kylie Jenner,” the publication said.

According to a Wednesday tweet from Reuters, the drop in Snap’s stock adds up to about $1.5 billion lost in market value.

Related: ‘Change it back’: Snapchat users not happy about latest update

Ten minutes after the first tweet, Jenner said she still has love for the app.

“Still love you tho snap,” she tweeted. “My first love.”

Jenner, who welcomed her first child, daughter Stormi Webster, Feb. 1, may have not opened the app because she’s busy with her little one and boyfriend Travis Scott.

Related: Kylie Jenner gives birth to baby girl

“Still staring at her all day,” Jenner told a fan of her newborn. “She looks just like me when I was a baby.”

Janney thought film acclaim eluded her _ then came 'I Tonya'

The Academy Awards seem like formality when it comes to the best supporting actress category this year.

Since the world devoured Allison Janney's brilliantly acidic performance as Tonya Harding's abusive mother in "I, Tonya," she has won nearly every major award she's been up for, including a BAFTA, a Screen Actors Guild award, a Golden Globe and a Critics' Choice prize.

Perhaps the only surprising fact is that this is the first Oscar nomination ever for the 58-year-old actress, who has seven Emmy and Screen Actors Guild Awards to her name (and two Tony nominations). Though she has been in Oscar-winning movies such as "Juno" and "The Help," the attention for those films did not revolve around her.

"I kind of thought maybe this moment had eluded me in my career, that I just wasn't getting the kind of roles in films that were giving me, getting me recognition," Janney reflected recently at the Oscars nominees' luncheon.

And it's all thanks to her longtime friend, screenwriter Steven Rogers, who had the idea to seek out the life rights to Tonya Harding's story. He had two demands for whoever was going to help get the movie made: First, no one was allowed to rewrite him. Second, Janney was to play LaVona Golden. He'd known Janney for decades, since he met her at New York's Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theater when he was only 17 (she's just a few years older than him), and had written parts for her before. But it hadn't worked out yet.

"I said, 'I want it in writing or it's a deal breaker.' I said it before she had even read the script or even said she would do it," Rogers said. "But I knew. I was like, 'This time I'm finally going to get her.'"

It might not seem like the most flattering thing to have your good friend think of you as the chain-smoking, bitter, abusive and overall controversial matriarch to the most infamous figure skater in history, who tells her young daughter to "skate wet" after she pees her pants on the ice, and regularly hits her. But Janney was thrilled.

"I've played a lot of mothers in my life," Janney, who stars as a recovering alcoholic on the CBS sitcom "Mom," said late last year. "But never anyone to the degree that this one was messed up."

Rogers, who used accounts of Tonya Harding and her ex-husband Jeff Gillooly to inform the screenplay and story, never actually met LaVona Golden while he was writing the script. Harding told him that she didn't know if her mother was dead or alive (she is alive and continues to deny abuse allegations).

Thus the character in "I, Tonya" is based on an amalgamation of interviews, documentary footage from 1986 (in which LaVona conducts her interview with a bird on her shoulder), stories from Harding and Gillooly and some artistic license.

"It's a pretty hard character and I hope the reason he wanted me to play her was because I would try my hardest ... to find her humanity," Janney said. "A lot of that was written in what Steven wrote in the direct address to the camera. That gave me a lot of clues as to who she was. She's a woman who gave her whole life to her daughter. Every penny she made went to her daughter's skating. She sees herself as a woman who tried her hardest to give her daughter a better life than she had. Those scenes helped me find her humanity, helped me find what made her a human being, not just an on the page monster."

For Janney, the experience of disappearing behind this woman who never smiles and never apologizes was liberating. And she found the nuance behind the steely exterior.

"My heart broke a little for her watching all these interviews because I could see under her denial, the hurt that's there," Janney said. When someone says 'I don't care, I could care less that we don't talk on the phone,' it's like, 'of course you do.'"

She even enjoyed the test of acting while trying to ignore the bird perched on her shoulder for the scenes where she's talking directly to the camera, in what she describes as the "Defending Your Life" sequence.

"It's like the bird heard me and said, 'Oh yeah?' Let's see if you can ignore me when I'm putting my head in your ear,'" Janney said. "I thought this is exactly the kind of humor that is perfect for this movie. I kind of loved it; as much as it was irritating me, it was also fueling me as I was trying to get my side of the story across."

Janney was distraught about not being able to have met her subject. She had a laundry list of questions she would have wanted to ask. What kind of upbringing did she have? What were her mother and father like? What happened with each of her four husbands? And, perhaps most importantly: What did she want to do when she was growing up? Did she have her own dreams?

"That would have been great to know," Janney said last year. So she used Rogers' script as her guide, and so far it has served her well on the road to the Oscars.

No matter what happens at the Academy Awards on March 4, where she's up against Laurie Metcalf ("Lady Bird"), Lesley Manville ("Phantom Thread"), Octavia Spencer ("The Shape of Water") and Mary J. Blige ("Mudbound"), Janney is just hopeful for what this might mean for her future in film.

She said she is "grateful" for this moment.

"Maybe this will break open my personal ceiling in the film world, that I might get more kinds of roles like these: interesting, challenging, important roles," Janney said.

____

AP writer Mike Cidoni Lennox contributed from Beverly Hills, Calif.

Report: Actress Rachel McAdams pregnant with first child

Congratulations are in order for actress Rachel McAdams, who is reportedly expecting her first child.

E! News, citing several unnamed sources, reported that the 39-year-old actress is pregnant.

>> Read more trending news 

In 2016, Us Weekly reported that the private star was seen holding hands with screenwriter Jamie Linden, which prompted speculation that they were dating.

McAdams has not commented on the report, but she has been vocal about becoming a mother in the past.

“Having a few (kids) would be great,” she told People in 2009. “My mom is a great inspiration to me. She’s a nurse and very nurturing and gentle. She lets me be who I am. Hopefully I can take on those qualities and be as great as her.”

Adams, who has a starring role in the movie “Game Night,” was not at the Los Angeles premiere of the movie Wednesday. According to E! News, the Canadian actress was last photographed in Toronto wearing a baggy jacket. 

Quincy Jones apologizes for candid remarks in Vulture, GQ interviews

Quincy Jones is apologizing for the very frank remarks hes made in interviews with GQ and Vulture. 

According to the music legend, his six daughters pulled him aside after reading his comments with the publications and showed him the impact of his words.

>> Read more trending news 

Jones posted a lengthy statement apologizing for the stories on Twitter, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

“I am an imperfect human and I’m not afraid to say it,” Jones wrote. “And I’m sorry and I’m not afraid to say it.

“When you’ve been fortunate enough to have lived such a long and crazy life (and you’ve recently stopped drinking – three years ago!), certain details about specific events (which do NOT paint the full picture of my intentions nor experiences) come flooding back all at once, and even at 85, it’s apparent that ‘wordvomit’ and bad-mouthing is inexcusable.”

Related: 9 of the best quotes from Quincy Jones’ sweeping Vulture interview

Most of the people Jones spoke about in the sweeping Vulture interview -- Jimi Hendrix, Michael Jackson, Richard Pryor and Marlon Brando among them -- are dead, but Jones said he personally apologized to those he could.

“I’m sorry to anyone whom my words offended and I’m especially sorry to my friends who are still here with me and to those who aren’t,” he wrote.

In the GQ interview, published Jan. 29, Jones spoke about partying with Ray Charles and Frank Sinatra and criticized artists like Taylor Swift for not creating “great songs.”

Jones told Vulture The Beatles were poor musicians.  He also made explicit remarks about the sex lives of Pryor and Brando. The Vulture interview was published Feb. 7.

Jones wrote, “One of the hardest things about this situation is that this bad-mouthing has contradicted the very real messages I tried to relay about racism, inequality homophobia, poverty...you name it. And of course I don’t want that. 

“I have already reached out to my friends privately, but when you live a public life, you have a responsibility to be an example, and since I do lead a public life, I wanted to make a public apology.”

Read Jones’ full statement below.

Eagles center Kelce plays sax with high school jazz band

Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce got attention for his impassioned and profane speech after the team's Super Bowl parade, but he's now communicating through music.

The jazz band from Kelce's Ohio high school alma mater was performing at a Philadelphia high school Thursday when he decided to lend some help. He borrowed one boy's saxophone and sat in with the Cleveland Heights High School band. He then stayed on to play with Philly's Central High School band, too.

He seemed to be holding his own, tapping his foot to the beat.

He's providing all kinds of inspiration for Philadelphia these days.

On Monday he gave a talk to the Phillies about being bold.

Led by Gigi Hadid, next-gen supermodels fill Milan runways

The next generation of supermodels was out in force on the second day of Milan Fashion Week on Thursday.

Gigi Hadid, sister Bella Hadid and Kaia Gerber walked for Max Mara and Fendi as Milan designers came up with looks for the power woman — giving expression to a movement of women showing they mean business as they unite to put an end to harassment in all forms and define themselves as they wish to be seen.

Some highlights from previews of next fall and winter, including shows by Max Mara, Fendi, Prada and Pucci.

___

MAX MARA'S POWER WOMAN

Gigi Hadid walked confidently for an early morning Max Mara call in a melange of leopard prints softened by wooly finishes.

A spotted sweater was tucked into a tight skirt and worn with a long Max Mara trench. The look was completed with leather gloves and suspenders, worn off the shoulders to show she's in charge.

The punk-inspired looks for a self-assured woman mixed leopard prints and plaids, the fashion house's trademark neutrals and a dab of pink. The collection aimed to break down the barriers between the power suit and the punk world that thrived in rebellion of it.

"We use all those emblems of rebellion as emblems of power," creative director Ian Griffiths said backstage. "This is a woman who is saying, 'Don't mess with me.'"

This silhouette veered from long, full blanket skirts belted for shape, to form-fitting ruched dresses worn over stretch pants or a pencil trouser. Max Mara's stronghold, the overcoat, united the looks, many with fringe along the sleeves. The brand dubbed it "they don't mess with me coat."

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FENDI ON POINT

And Gigi Hadid was back on the runway for Fendi a few hours later, donning a prim and pretty dress: a white shirt top that created a statuesque bust topping a long-sleeved pleated dress in a serious brown.

That sense of purity and cleanness was echoed in scalloped white blouses with lace panels and embroidered details.

Cinched waists and box shoulders gave definition to Karl Lagerfeld's Fendi womenswear collection for next winter.

The stand-out accessories were mini-capes — Fendi also called them shoulder slips — that topped off looks, a hedge against cold or rain. They were square-shouldered with a vinyl effect, mini puffer capes or rich fur.

Pleats repeated themselves like a motif: pretty on silk dresses, hidden in the sides of overcoats, or forming a formal peplum under a belted suit jacket or atop a longer skirt.

The double-F logo made a cameo, on off the shoulder dresses, fur coats and sporty mink scarfs.

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NEON PRADA

Miuccia Prada showed her latest collection against the backdrop of the Milan night through the windows of the Prada Foundation's new high-rise. A chimp, an alien and a stegosaurus in neon lights hovered in the background through the pane glass windows.

With Bill Murray in the audience, it was hard not to conjure images of Tokyo in Lost in Translation. But the Prada story this season, and in general, isn't about a young girl reflecting her loneliness in an older figure, but of a young woman asserting her own power.

For Miuccia Prada, the neon colors that illuminated the collection offered a sort of protection for women against the night.

"I imagined that the woman can go super sexy in the street at night without being bothered," Prada said.

Bright colors punctuated the looks, with blurred prints prints on coats and dresses that had the effect of neon colors shown through rain-splattered glass. The women's looks echoed the men's collection with black vinyl dresses and neoprene anoraks and vests, but with the femininity underlined by pretty pink netting bows and underlays.

Prada said the collection was meant as a dialogue between strength and femininity, "the constant dialogue and struggle."

"The whole problem of my job is how women can be powerful and still being feminine. It is not something that is not clear yet," she said.

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SPORTY, SEDUCTIVE PUCCI

Emilio Pucci's womenswear collection punctuated the brand's trademark prints with blocks of color, peacock blue with magenta, teal with royal blue, seafoam green with black.

The collection, created by a design team while the house seeks a new creative director, featured kaleidoscopic archival prints of tulips and clovers.

Sportier looks featured puffer jackets over printed skirts and quilted bra tops, or overcoats mixing quilting with leather.

Silky dresses with lace panels, and long jersey knits, clung to the figure. Looks were finished with turban-like quilted caps and puffy scarfs.

Tiffany Haddish to host MTV Movie & TV Awards in June

Tiffany Haddish is set to host the 2018 MTV Movie & TV Awards.

The network announced Thursday that the "Girls Trip" breakout star will host the ceremony in Los Angeles on June 18.

The 38-year-old actress and comedian has seen her star rise since "Girls Trip" was released last summer. She's gone on to host "Saturday Night Live" and star in a Super Bowl commercial. Haddish also helped announce the Academy Award nominees last month and will appear on the Oscar telecast on March 4.

She's also starring with Tracy Morgan in a new TBS sitcom called "The Last OG" and will appear alongside Kevin Hart in the film "Night School" later this year.

Beyonce has nothing to do with new ‘Sweet Dreams’ remix

It’s been nearly 10 years since Beyonce released “Sweet Dreams,” the sixth single from 2008’s “I Am... Sasha Fierce,” but a remix of the song appeared on streaming services Wednesday.

>> Read more trending news 

Billboard reported that the new version, which appears on a 2018 album called “Sweet Dreams (Remixes),” has a more hip-hop sound than the electro-synth original. 

Beyonce herself had nothing to do with the release. Pitchfork reported that a representative for the singer confirmed it is not an official release.

The “Sweet Dreams” remix is on Tidal and Apple Music. A clip can be heard below.

Tim McGraw Speaks Out About Parkland, Florida Shooting

A lot of celebrities are speaking out about many of today’s tragedies. Tim Mcgraw is no different. He has taken to Facebook to share his feelings on the shooting that happened over a week ago in Parkland, Florida. He writes “ I learned one of the teachers who was shot in Florida at Stoneman Douglas, Scott Beigel, was a friend of one of my associates – they were camp counselors together. What an amazing man who lost his life protecting the children. That is a true hero. And I’m deeply moved by these students who are lifting their voices – challenging us to listen, learn, and make real changes.  #NeverAgain“

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